Cutting sugar from diet - effects on me.

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  • CHRISB50CHRISB50 Frets: 1750

    Some great stories in this thread.


    I'm trying to do a bit of a fat burn in January (although I only started on Tuesday).


    I have decided to minimise carbs, especially sugar (read chocolate and ale), and concentrate on veg and protein, while maintaining my normal training.


    I tried to bulk up last year and put on a stone between May and November. Most of it is muscle but it's impossible to avoid adding a bit of fat too. I'm weighing in at just over 12 stone at the moment, so I'm intrigued to see how much I can lose, and also if there is any visible difference.

    I can't help about the shape I'm in, I can't sing I ain't pretty and my legs are thin

    But don't ask me what I think of you, I might not give the answer that you want me to

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  • ESBlondeESBlonde Frets: 2262
    The dangers of sugar have been known for a long time (decades), the problem for us ordinary peeps is that sugar goes by stealth names too like succrose and various fruit or corn based ingredients that all have the same or worse effect on the body that pure refined white sugar.
    The powerful US food industry lobbied hard during the 60s to make fat the bad boy in diets and for many years afterwards pumped the industrial food production with salt and sugar types. This fortunately coincided with the development by a Japanese scientist with the ability to make fructose/syrup/sugar from maize/corn cheaply and that coincided with the developments that allowed farmers to increase acerage and density of production for corn on the US plains.
    Now the general western population have a taste for those foods which can be cheaply produced it is a problem we each have to face on a daily basis. I put on 3lbs in December! stricter diet now in place, who can only eat 6 biscuits at a time?



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  • ZoolooterZoolooter Frets: 231
    edited January 11
    CHRISB50 said:

    Some great stories in this thread.


    I'm trying to do a bit of a fat burn in January (although I only started on Tuesday).


    I have decided to minimise carbs, especially sugar (read chocolate and ale), and concentrate on veg and protein, while maintaining my normal training.


    I tried to bulk up last year and put on a stone between May and November. Most of it is muscle but it's impossible to avoid adding a bit of fat too. I'm weighing in at just over 12 stone at the moment, so I'm intrigued to see how much I can lose, and also if there is any visible difference.

    I'd be interested too hear about what your eating. I hit the gym two years ago, loaded up on protein and veg. Got somewhere with a bit of shape and extra muscle, but in the last five months all the good work has nearly gone due the circumstance of not being able to go to the gym. 

    So, starting the gym again this week. I massively struggle with breakfast, don't like/can't eat porridge, cereal (bran and muesli  has too many calories, and the two pieces of toast I used to have is not an option as I'm trying to loose weight.
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  • munckeemunckee Frets: 1032
    DiscoStu said:
    Like others I can't drink tea or coffee without sugar. Believe me, I've tried! I used to take 2 sugars but now it's only 1, I've tried reducing that again to a half but I don't like it. I'm sceptical about sweeteners.

    I could certainly eat less chocolate as like the OP I am partial to something sweet after a meal and usually reach for a choccy bar. I drink beer and I like rum+coke. Coke is a biggie and I have wanted to cut it out for ages but rum+coke is just so tasty! Would swapping my mixer to apple juice be much of an improvement?

    I cook most of my meals from fresh so added sugars in food isn't a huge problem so for me I guess it's the Coke and the chocolate.
    And the crisps. Always crisps.
    Mmm, crisps.
    I agree about the tea but having decided I was cutting it out I can't go back, that would be a sign of weakness!  Same way I gave up smoking, every time I wanted a cigarette I just didn't have one.


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  • jaygtrjaygtr Frets: 217
    edited January 11
    Zoolooter said:
    CHRISB50 said:
    I'd be interested too hear about what your eating. I hit the gym two years ago, loaded up on protein and veg. Got somewhere with a bit of shape and extra muscle, but in the last five months all the good work has nearly gone due the circumstance of not being able to go to the gym. 

    So, starting the gym again this week. I massively struggle with breakfast, don't like/can't eat porridge, cereal (bran and muesli  has too many calories, and the two pieces of toast I used to have is not an option as I'm trying to loose weight.


    Have te you tried the 16/8 diet, I mentioned it in the porridge thread elsewhere. 
    It means you can skip breakfast if you want. 
    Ive been on it for over 2 years now and it was completely life transforming.
    i used come home from work a basically do nothing as I was tired. Now have loads of energy all day. 
    Its only tough for about a week as your body soon adapts. Most people have completely lost the ability to burn fat as they get all their energy from the food they eat. 
    This way you train your body to use fat reserves instead. 
    If your working out along side the diet google the "lean gains diet"" to see how to do it. 

    you have to watch the carbs though!
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  • CHRISB50CHRISB50 Frets: 1750
    edited January 11
    Zoolooter said:
    CHRISB50 said:

    Some great stories in this thread.


    I'm trying to do a bit of a fat burn in January (although I only started on Tuesday).


    I have decided to minimise carbs, especially sugar (read chocolate and ale), and concentrate on veg and protein, while maintaining my normal training.


    I tried to bulk up last year and put on a stone between May and November. Most of it is muscle but it's impossible to avoid adding a bit of fat too. I'm weighing in at just over 12 stone at the moment, so I'm intrigued to see how much I can lose, and also if there is any visible difference.

    I'd be interested too hear about what your eating. I hit the gym two years ago, loaded up on protein and veg. Got somewhere with a bit of shape and extra muscle, but in the last five months all the good work has nearly gone due the circumstance of not being able to go to the gym. 

    So, starting the gym again this week. I massively struggle with breakfast, don't like/can't eat porridge, cereal (bran and muesli  has too many calories, and the two pieces of toast I used to have is not an option as I'm trying to loose weight.

    Now, I'm eating a handful of walnuts (fatty, but a decent protein source and the fat is burnt at the gym) for breakfast, with a couple of espressos + protein shake. Lunch is baked or grilled meat of some sort, with leaves / cucumber / toms / beetroot / spring onions, I split it into two helpings and have them an hour and half or so apart. Gym or workout at home, then a protein shake. Dinner is baked or grilled meat with lots of veg. Last night I had baked chicken with broccoli, cauliflower and sprouts. Tonight is scrambled eggs with cracked black pepper and salad. I'll eat between dinner and bed but only something like a low fat yoghurt with another small helping of nuts and seeds.


    Hope this helps.


    Edit. I forgot to add I drink water / lemon and ginger or green tea all day. Normally between 1 and 2 litres of water plus 5 or 6 cups of tea. I don't have an issue sleeping due to the caffeine in the green tea, but you have to be careful with lemon and ginger. Drink too much and the ginger gives you the shits (although this could count as accelerated weight loss!).

    I can't help about the shape I'm in, I can't sing I ain't pretty and my legs are thin

    But don't ask me what I think of you, I might not give the answer that you want me to

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  • SporkySporky Frets: 12905
    Grunfeld said:

    FWIW (which may not be much), my view used to be pretty much that but it has shifted a bit.  The "bit" is the notion that not all calories are created equal.  On the one hand, (which probably belongs to a physicist), a calorie is undoubtedly a calorie.  And it is possible to reduce weight if you only ate chocolate bars but were in a calorie deficit at the end of the day.  E.g. the "Twinkies Diet" which was a demonstration solely to prove that point.

    However, on the other hand, foods relatively dense in sugar and starches raise blood glucose --> which requires insulin to deal with it.  And, all other things being equal insulin is a fat-storing hormone.  Which is why the type of dietary changes @jonnyburgo and others on here have made are noticeably efficient for weight reduction.  (Because they don't stimulate production of gallons of insulin, therefore you're not storing that glucose-that's-been-dealt-with-by-insulin portion of your diet as fat. <-- a bit 101 but that's my ultra-basic understanding)

    I was being pretty reductionist about it, and you're not (to my knowledge) wrong about storing stuff as fat, but if you're taking in fewer calories than you're using you burn the fat up. Reducing sugar intake is almost certainly good for people (if you didn't eat any sugar at all you could still have a healthy balanced diet - the same is not true of fat or protein).

    Grunfeld said:

    The real fascination for me is the type of thinking and behaviour that @Neill described with his overweight friend.  I read that and think, okay that's extreme but I'm like that a bit.  How come I don't change my behaviour to what I know would be good for me?  What's keeping people stuck?
    I wonder if it's the same thing that keeps anyone stuck in anything - essentially they don't want to make the necessary changes. Once they do, they will. A bit like the "motivation" myth - people do what they want to do.

    think it's breakable by evaluation - if you rationally considered the changes you'd need to make, you'd probably find that they're neither onerous nor particularly huge. So in this case calorie counting might work for some people - if you could be inside a weight-loss calorie budget while still being allowed the odd biscuit and meals you enjoyed then it would look quite different from if you thought you'd be on cabbage soup for six months.

    Mebbe.

    Be your own evil twin. 
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  • munckeemunckee Frets: 1032
    Zoolooter said:
    CHRISB50 said:

    Some great stories in this thread.


    I'm trying to do a bit of a fat burn in January (although I only started on Tuesday).


    I have decided to minimise carbs, especially sugar (read chocolate and ale), and concentrate on veg and protein, while maintaining my normal training.


    I tried to bulk up last year and put on a stone between May and November. Most of it is muscle but it's impossible to avoid adding a bit of fat too. I'm weighing in at just over 12 stone at the moment, so I'm intrigued to see how much I can lose, and also if there is any visible difference.

    I'd be interested too hear about what your eating. I hit the gym two years ago, loaded up on protein and veg. Got somewhere with a bit of shape and extra muscle, but in the last five months all the good work has nearly gone due the circumstance of not being able to go to the gym. 

    So, starting the gym again this week. I massively struggle with breakfast, don't like/can't eat porridge, cereal (bran and muesli  has too many calories, and the two pieces of toast I used to have is not an option as I'm trying to loose weight.
    I'm losing a bit of weight at the moment as going to center parcs end of the month, I have pretty much all my excess calories for breakfast as its hardest to find breakfast I like thats low calorie.  I have two slices of toast with organic peanut butter which has no sugar added, part of the breakfast like a king logic.  A slice of wholemal toast with no butter and scrambled eggs on top is low calorie and low fat and tastes good.
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  • SporkySporky Frets: 12905
    munckee said:

    I'm losing a bit of weight at the moment as going to center parcs end of the month, I have pretty much all my excess calories for breakfast as its hardest to find breakfast I like thats low calorie.
    265 kcal for a thin bagel with two slices of grilled bacon in it. A bit of ketchup or brown sauce or similar only adds 20 tops.
    Be your own evil twin. 
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  • SporkySporky Frets: 12905
    munckee said:

    I'm losing a bit of weight at the moment as going to center parcs end of the month, I have pretty much all my excess calories for breakfast as its hardest to find breakfast I like thats low calorie.
    265 kcal for a thin bagel with two slices of grilled bacon in it. A bit of ketchup or brown sauce or similar only adds 20 tops.
    Be your own evil twin. 
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  • SnapSnap Frets: 2178
    I dunno, I think there is a lot of snake oil and hoodoo about this diet that diet, what you should, should not eat. I'm into fitness and nutrition and have been a gym goer for 30 years. I'm not saying I'm an expert, but my weight (and more importand clothes sizes) has been the same give or take a kilo since I was about 23 (I'm 48).

    You can eat what the hell you like. The key is, don't over do it. If you eat fresh food, don't over indulge in processed stuff like cakes, biscuits, takeaways, stay reasonably active, most people will be just fine.

    You can obsess about fat, carbs, protein all you like - all you need balanced nutrition, and activity.

    Most people who are overweight, or lardy, are that way because they had eaten too much crappy food for too long. ALl the exercise in the world is a waste if you don't eat properly.

    5/2, paleo, Atkins, keto, whatever diet: they are vehicles to sell books and youtube space. IMO its largely all unnecessary.

    Go back a few decades and most people weren't overweight. At school in the 70s and 80s the fat kid was a rarity. What's changed - the availability of more cheap easy crap food.

    So, I'm not a believer in diet plans tbh. But I am a big believer of eating fresh balanced food, in moderation.

    There's nothing wrong with bread, just eat wholemeal, and not at every meal, and not umpteen slices. Nothing wrong with butter - just don't ladle it on. Full fat milk? Complete food, full of everything you need.
    Potatoes - marvellous, just don't eat a whole sack.

    There are very few "bad" foodstuffs: the problem starts when you eat too much of them.
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  • DesVegasDesVegas Frets: 3475
    Good for you Jonny
    trust me I'm a stomach
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  • munckeemunckee Frets: 1032
    Snap said:
    I dunno, I think there is a lot of snake oil and hoodoo about this diet that diet, what you should, should not eat. I'm into fitness and nutrition and have been a gym goer for 30 years. I'm not saying I'm an expert, but my weight (and more importand clothes sizes) has been the same give or take a kilo since I was about 23 (I'm 48).

    You can eat what the hell you like. The key is, don't over do it. If you eat fresh food, don't over indulge in processed stuff like cakes, biscuits, takeaways, stay reasonably active, most people will be just fine.

    You can obsess about fat, carbs, protein all you like - all you need balanced nutrition, and activity.

    Most people who are overweight, or lardy, are that way because they had eaten too much crappy food for too long. ALl the exercise in the world is a waste if you don't eat properly.

    5/2, paleo, Atkins, keto, whatever diet: they are vehicles to sell books and youtube space. IMO its largely all unnecessary.

    Go back a few decades and most people weren't overweight. At school in the 70s and 80s the fat kid was a rarity. What's changed - the availability of more cheap easy crap food.

    So, I'm not a believer in diet plans tbh. But I am a big believer of eating fresh balanced food, in moderation.

    There's nothing wrong with bread, just eat wholemeal, and not at every meal, and not umpteen slices. Nothing wrong with butter - just don't ladle it on. Full fat milk? Complete food, full of everything you need.
    Potatoes - marvellous, just don't eat a whole sack.

    There are very few "bad" foodstuffs: the problem starts when you eat too much of them.
    This all makes a lot of sense as someone else said these diets are good for concentrating the mind as much as anything else.  My wife's weight yo yo's and then each time she re-joins slimming world, the best thing it has going is a room full of people knowing whether you lost any weight that week or not!

    About 6 years ago I gave up going to the gym and I much prefer old fashioned exercise, running, cycling, press-ups, pull ups etc.  I'm also a lot more focussed on fitness rather than body building as I get older as the last thing I want is any extra weight.
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  • crunchmancrunchman Frets: 3495
    Grunfeld said:
    Sporky said:
    Fundamentally if you use more calories than you eat then you'll lose weight; if it's the other way around then you'll gain wait. Counting calories is therefore the most successful approach to losing weight - and partly because it means you can still have chocolate, cake, biscuits, and sugar in your coffee, as long as you balance that.
    FWIW (which may not be much), my view used to be pretty much that but it has shifted a bit.  The "bit" is the notion that not all calories are created equal.  On the one hand, (which probably belongs to a physicist), a calorie is undoubtedly a calorie.  And it is possible to reduce weight if you only ate chocolate bars but were in a calorie deficit at the end of the day.  E.g. the "Twinkies Diet" which was a demonstration solely to prove that point.


    A physicist wouldn't use an archaic imperial unit like a Calorie.  Use a sensible unit like kJ. / pedant rant

    I can relate to a lot of what has been said.  I don't have biscuits, because when I do I tend to eat the whole packet.

    I don't have sugar in drinks but that is for dental reasons.  About 25 years ago, when I went to the dentist after not having been for several years, I had to have 5 fillings.  Stopped sugar in coffee and tea overnight.  These days I can't abide coffee and tea with sugar - it just tastes sickly.

    My normal eating is ok.  I don't put on weight, and I might lose weight very slowly.  My problem is that as soon as I drink any beer, I just tend to balloon.  My wife and daughters like baking as well, so I tend to end up with lots of stuff to eat as an end result of that.

    Exercise does make a difference.  I could eat a lot more when I was cycling a 15 mile round trip to work than now when I am cycling a 4 mile round trip.

    I've either got to find a way of eating slightly less, or upping my exercise a bit.

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  • SnapSnap Frets: 2178
    edited January 11
    munckee said:

    About 6 years ago I gave up going to the gym and I much prefer old fashioned exercise, running, cycling, press-ups, pull ups etc.  I'm also a lot more focussed on fitness rather than body building as I get older as the last thing I want is any extra weight.
    All my gym work is around fitness and fat burning. 3 days of large muscle heavy weights, 2 days of boxing, core/full body stuff. I keep an eye on body fat/visceral fat too.

    With eating, I think the whole fault lies in any sort of diet. To keep trim requires proper eating, not a diet (which is time limited), but a change in attitude to food that becomes the routine. Mostly that (all IMO and IME) relies on portion control.

    Its easy to slip into eating relatively massive meals, but it doesn't take long to change that back to more reasonable sizied portions.

    Not eating between meals too - hard at first, but once you get into it, easy to maintain.

    Eating is too often seen as something to fill boredom, or as a pastime. Food is fuel firstly. I love good food as much as anyone, enjoy cooking, eating out etc. But, once it becomes something you simply do when you get a bit bored, or its an accompaniment to say watching TV, or relaxing, then the calories soon rack up. When you start eatin for the sake of it, that is when the gut will start to grow.

    If you eat only at mealtimes, 3 a day, good food, you'll be reet.

    All this skipping meals - bad news. If you do that, your body shifts into starvation mode and begins to convert ingested calories into fat stores, more than it would usually. You are better off eating regularly and particularly eating a good breakfast. I feel rank if I don't have a good start to the day.

    Its basic stuff eating, but these charlatans with their hokum diets are making big money out of peddling malarkey to people.




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  • jaygtrjaygtr Frets: 217
    I think this thread pretty much sums up why so many people are over weight, with so many diets and opinions. 

    But basically if your dieting  to lose weight you need to burn more calories or kj's than you consume. If you do that you will lose weight. ( unless you have some underlying health problem- thyroid etc ). Simple. It doesn't matter how you do it. It's just really hard to keep it up for long periods.  

    If your dieting to be healthier, you've got to change your lifestyle  permenantly , so you have to find something that works for you, and you can stick at and is healthy.  
    If you do you'll be fine. 
    But its not easy, increasing your veg and limiting carbs and junk food is a real challenge. 



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  • munckeemunckee Frets: 1032
    "All my gym work is around fitness and fat burning. 3 days of large muscle heavy weights, 2 days of boxing, core/full body stuff. I keep an eye on body fat/visceral fat too."

    Do you build/cut along with your weights, when I did body build I used to make a homemade protein shake from a recipe I got from a swimming club:

    1 pint semi skimmed milk, 4.5 heaped tablespoons dried skimmed milk powder, 3 heaped teaspoons drinking chocolate:


    Nutritional Information based on the above is as follows Total
    Energy kcal 274 206 192 672 kcal
    (Energy) (kJ) (1140) (875) (819) (2834 kJ)
    Protein g 19 21 3 43 g
    Carbohydrate g 29 30 38 97 g
    Fat g 9.1 0.3 3.1 12.5 g
    Vitamin A μg 328 328 μg
    Vitamin B12 μg 2.3 2.3 μg
    Vitamin D μg 0.8 0.8 μg
    Sodium g 0.6 0.6 g
    Calcium mg 684 730 1414 mg
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  • GrunfeldGrunfeld Frets: 2604
    edited January 11
    jaygtr said:
    I think this thread pretty much sums up why so many people are over weight, with so many diets and opinions. 

    But basically if your dieting  to lose weight you need to burn more calories or kj's than you consume. If you do that you will lose weight. ( unless you have some underlying health problem- thyroid etc ). Simple. It doesn't matter how you do it. It's just really hard to keep it up for long periods.  [emphasis added]

    The "maths" bit is simple.  And for me that suggests there are not that many opinions which disagree with the maths bit.  Not on here anyway -- not compared to the sad and desperate comments you'll find in other parts of the net which reflect some bonkers ideas about how to lose weight.  No, here we get the maths.
    The "why" of why so many people are over-weight isn't to do with the maths, or misunderstandings of "so many diets" - (I've not seen that many advocated really,.  Mostly just an acknowledgement that processed food with its hidden sugars is problematic for weight reduction, and positive suggestions which are variations of eat veg and limit carbs which is what you've suggested too).

    It's the second part of what you wrote which is why so many people are over-weight. 
    How to make behavioural change.  Not what to do, but how to do it.

    I was reading some studies of cases of bariatric  surgery where subjects had lost a ton of weight, were down to a healthy weight, but were still terribly, terribly unhappy.  Interesting stuff. 

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  • SnapSnap Frets: 2178
    @munckee

    Not body building mate. Just using heavy weights on large muscle groups which is better than cardio for burning fat. Also whole body exercises. You want to burn fat you need to get those big muscles working hard. It also keeps your testosterone levels up and also increases your metabolic rate for longer. Only 35-45 minute sessions too.

    To keep on top of my protein intake I use pea protein (about 2 or 3 tbsps) which I put into a smoothie that I have most mornings for my breakfast (with usually nothing else) - spinach, kale, banana, almond milk, chia seeds, bit of cacao, ginger, cucumber, celery, maybe beetroot, maybe a few blueberries, a few cashews or walnuts, couple of spoonfuls of Skyr. That does a couple of breakfasts.
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  • SporkySporky Frets: 12905
    Grunfeld said:

    I was reading some studies of cases of bariatric  surgery where subjects had lost a ton of weight, were down to a healthy weight, but were still terribly, terribly unhappy.  Interesting stuff. 
    I wonder if that's about expectations. If they thought their lives would be better if they lost weight then it's probably rather disappointing to find that they're still them, just a thinner them.
    Be your own evil twin. 
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  • SnapSnap Frets: 2178
    Sporky said:
    Grunfeld said:

    I was reading some studies of cases of bariatric  surgery where subjects had lost a ton of weight, were down to a healthy weight, but were still terribly, terribly unhappy.  Interesting stuff. 
    I wonder if that's about expectations. If they thought their lives would be better if they lost weight then it's probably rather disappointing to find that they're still them, just a thinner them.
    I don't think its unusual for people who are obese to have mental health challenges too. From personal experience (close relative) I know that there is a vicious cycle of self loathing that goes with the obesity that propels the binge eating and weight gain. I think for some people who really suffer like this, the gastric band is only part of the solution. I am sure there is also some body dysmorphia going on too.

    Where someone is very overweight, addressing the weight is sometimes only part of getting them to a place where they can be happy with who they are.

    I can go on and on about weight, but I am very aware that for many people its not just a physical problem, its a mental one too, and that is much more difficult to sort out.
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  • GrunfeldGrunfeld Frets: 2604
    edited January 11
    Sporky said:
    I wonder if that's about expectations. If they thought their lives would be better if they lost weight then it's probably rather disappointing to find that they're still them, just a thinner them.
    I wish I could remember in more detail.  (I got distracted from what I was supposed to be studying... a bit like now really...)
    But I think you're correct.  iirc there had been a sense in which they used to look in the mirror and couldn't really accept themselves "because they were fat" -- except that it wasn't because they were fat.  It's just that the fatness was the focus.  Once the fat had gone some of them were in a worse pickle because they'd actually lost the focus for their problems.  They looked in the mirror, saw the slim version, and still couldn't accept themselves -- and being slim they didn't have the "excuse/reason" of fatness as the cause of their misery.

    The thrust of what the psychologists were trying to do from there (again, iirc), was to establish and clarify a values system with the subjects.  Basically, there's no point in losing weight if you're not going to do something useful and valuable with your new body. 

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  • jaygtrjaygtr Frets: 217
    edited January 11
    @Grunfeld ;
    it is indeed interesting stuff, and also sad in many cases. 
    My mother in law is over weight by 15-20kgs and lives a life of constant guilt.
       Watching what she eats without ever losing weight. Starting diets and never lasting more than 2 or 3 days. Exercising once and then doing none for months.
    always miserable about it too. 
    I don't think she'll ever do it. My wife and I can't help either. 

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  • SporkySporky Frets: 12905
    I am not a qualified anything related to the subject, but I think the whole "you're still you" thing is probably important.

    I lost a decent amount of weight; I look better now and I am much fitter, but I am still definitely me with some better habits and smaller trousers. That's fine, but I don't think losing weight has made me happier - nor did I expect it to. Just as there have been times when I've felt short of money and caught myself thinking "If I could only win the lottery..." - but didn't buy a ticket because I recognised that I wasn't telling myself the truth.

    am happy that I did a thing that I decided I would do.
    Be your own evil twin. 
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  • ZoolooterZoolooter Frets: 231
    @jaygtr cheers buddy, that 16:8 diet sounds prefect for me. I was never one for breakfast anyway. The 11am to 7pm slot is perfect, I'll be on that from tomorrow.
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  • thecolourboxthecolourbox Frets: 2905

    Well do to those giving this a go. I'm trying to lose weight as while I still have a 29" waist I'm heavier than I've ever been at 13stone. I'm finding it generally pretty easy to cut down the food during the day (especially after having eaten everything within sight over Christmas) by eating boring lunch to enable me to have a nice dinner whilst still only being on around 1200 calories per day, more when I go swimming a few times a week to offset kind of thing. Hopefully it works.

    I think the key though is more restraint and less deprivation - I understand people saying that sugar free versions of stuff should be better, but let's be honest they taste of sweeteners which are not great and I'm not fully convinced that some of the artificial sweeteners are any better for you than sugar overall. But each to their own I think, some may find it better to have none at all than compromise I guess.

    A handy tip I've learnt and followed is to still have the odd treat, say a Dairy Milk bar, but cut it in half. Eat half of it, and put the other half in your drawer or if you're up for the ultimate test of your willpower, in clear view. Eat the rest tomorrow. not only are you still getting your treat, you're cutting your intake in half, and you're getting into the habit of restraint and steering away from portion distortion.

    Having said that, what I am struggling with (and would appreciate any tips from you lot) is that whilst I will feel better for this day to day, the fact remains that I do actually enjoy stuffing my face with an entire box of Guylian seashells, and whilst this may be unhelpful to the thread, i'm not 100% sure feeling healthier feels better than those damn fine seashells taste. I'm hoping that restraint pulls me through, it's working so far but I do currently have a HUGE box of Guylian chocs in my living room which if I try to eat one per day will go stale before I finish them (i'd say it was like a2 paper sized box) so that will be my ultimate test of willpower :(

    And if there's anything good about me, I'm the only one who knows

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  • menamestommenamestom Frets: 2184
    Snap said:
    munckee said:

    About 6 years ago I gave up going to the gym and I much prefer old fashioned exercise, running, cycling, press-ups, pull ups etc.  I'm also a lot more focussed on fitness rather than body building as I get older as the last thing I want is any extra weight.


    All this skipping meals - bad news. If you do that, your body shifts into starvation mode and begins to convert ingested calories into fat stores, more than it would usually. You are better off eating regularly and particularly eating a good breakfast. I feel rank if I don't have a good start to the day.


    I think there's quite a lot of research pointing to the contrary.  Your body doesn't go into starvation mode for skipping a meal.

    You can go 72 hours without food with your metabolic rate staying the same.  I think most diets go against this principle because we're told to eat ourselves thin by the diet industry.  But if you don't want breakfast, it won't do any harm if you get your required nutrition at other meal times.

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/9B489A336FA5E425637450982AD386AD/S0007114594002151a.pdf/cardiovascular_metabolic_and_hormonal_changes_accompanying_acute_starvation_in_men_and_women.pdf

    There are actually quite a few benefits to having periods of 'not eating', decreased insulin levels and improved insulin sensitivity, increase in growth hormone.  I don't think as humans we're biologically supposed to be full of food all the time.  Obviously fasting with an otherwise health balanced diet is not to be confused with bad eaters who don't get the required nutrition by long term random meal skipping and eating the wrong things.

    I agree with almost everything you have said, but fasting can be a way of a life rather than a diet and there are tangible benefits, as long as it is controlled and with an otherwise balanced diet. 

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  • thecolourboxthecolourbox Frets: 2905
    Incidentally I just Google searched the 16/8 diet and it seems I've done that for years as I never have breakfast, first thing I eat is usually lunch about 1pm then have my dinner usually at 8pm. Clearly why I look like Hugh Jackman in Wolverine

    And if there's anything good about me, I'm the only one who knows

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  • menamestommenamestom Frets: 2184
    Incidentally I just Google searched the 16/8 diet and it seems I've done that for years as I never have breakfast, first thing I eat is usually lunch about 1pm then have my dinner usually at 8pm. Clearly why I look like Hugh Jackman in Wolverine

    I'm doing the 8/16.  It's great, eat for a 16 hour window then sleep for an 8 hour fast.
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  • monquixotemonquixote Frets: 8137
    I think you have to be very careful with the "a calorie is a calorie" line and not just because there is a huge well funded set of lobbyists and pressure groups set up to push that message on behalf of the fast food industry ( not to mention demonize sweeteners).

    Eating the same calories predominantly as sugar is going to cause a whole host of medical issues regardless of your weight and compared to things like fat and protein that are filling result in you craving more food shortly afterwards. 

    I lost a ton of weight mainly by running and trying to cut back sugar. I am also a breakfast hater so I'm glad the "most important meal of the day" thing is largely debunked.
    Handsome_Chris said: Like white Nile Rodgers. 
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