Cutting sugar from diet - effects on me.

What's Hot
13»

Comments

  • jaygtrjaygtr Frets: 218
    The 16/8 is not as weird as it sounds. 
    It basically involves eating nothing after your evening meal (which tends to be junk anyway) and delaying breakfast for a couple of hrs. 
    I found it tough for the first week or so because I struggled in the mornings without breakfast. 
    But as soon as my body started working as it should and could burn fat for energy it was easy, as long as I go easy on the carbs


    Now im no longer a slave to food. I can eat when I want. 
    I do virtually all my bike training and weights etc in a fasted state and it's no problem. 
    Last year I climbed scafell  pike and didn't eat a thing until I got to the summit! And still felt good. 

    As as I said earlier it's been life changing and easy too. 

    Sorry im a 16/8 fanboy I'm afraid :3
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • SporkySporky Frets: 13728

    Eating the same calories predominantly as sugar is going to cause a whole host of medical issues regardless of your weight and compared to things like fat and protein that are filling result in you craving more food shortly afterwards. 

    That's obviously true, but at the same time I don't think anyone here who's said calories in vs calories out is suggesting an all-sugar diet.

    Energy consumed vs energy used is undeniably the root of weight gain vs weight loss. That in no way suggests having an unhealthy diet.
    Be your own evil twin. 
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • monquixotemonquixote Frets: 8151
    jaygtr said:
    The 16/8 is not as weird as it sounds. 
    It basically involves eating nothing after your evening meal (which tends to be junk anyway) and delaying breakfast for a couple of hrs. 
    I found it tough for the first week or so because I struggled in the mornings without breakfast. 
    But as soon as my body started working as it should and could burn fat for energy it was easy, as long as I go easy on the carbs


    Now im no longer a slave to food. I can eat when I want. 
    I do virtually all my bike training and weights etc in a fasted state and it's no problem. 
    Last year I climbed scafell  pike and didn't eat a thing until I got to the summit! And still felt good. 

    As as I said earlier it's been life changing and easy too. 

    Sorry im a 16/8 fanboy I'm afraid :3

    Me too 

    I broke my 10k record today in a fasted state. 
    Handsome_Chris said: Like white Nile Rodgers. 
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • SporkySporky Frets: 13728
    I'm not sure that'd work for me.

    When I get up in the morning it's only the knowledge that there is food downstairs that keeps me from cannibalism.
    Be your own evil twin. 
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • TimmyOTimmyO Frets: 2912
    edited January 12
    I’ve enjoyed the most success on the higher fat, lower carb style of eating. There’s probably a bunch of reasons it works for me but one big plus is that food without all the fat taken away still tastes great.

    The initial period where your body switches back to using fat as a primary fuel source is tough - but only lasts between a 3-10 days after which all the stuff elsewhere in this thread happens - energy, appetite change, sensible rate of weight loss.

    This LCHF style eating lost me a load of weight a few years back. I’m a week in on another round
    "Congratulations on being officially the most right anyone has ever been about anything, ever." -- Noisepolluter knows the score
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • jonnyburgojonnyburgo Frets: 6087
    All good opinions here, as I said in the op the only change I’ve made is cutting biscuits chocolate and crisps out, which are my Achilles heel and that’s enough for me to lose weight my cycle to work is only 5 miles but is all uphill with a very steep 1 mile near the end as I work up in the hills. I’ve been chopping and sawing wood for the fire for an hour this morning and worked up a sweat and feeling all the better for it, now if I get a little dip I’ll chomp down a banana and an apple which sees me through. Well done to you guys that are on the case, lots of different approaches and if it works for you then it works! I could never diet as that would feel restrictive and I’d spit my dummy out after a couple of days.
    "OUR TOSSPOT"
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • SporkySporky Frets: 13728
    I could never diet as that would feel restrictive and I’d spit my dummy out after a couple of days.
    I think the word "diet" probably ruins a fair few sensible eating plans!
    Be your own evil twin. 
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • SnapSnap Frets: 2348
    edited January 12
    Snap said:
    munckee said:

    About 6 years ago I gave up going to the gym and I much prefer old fashioned exercise, running, cycling, press-ups, pull ups etc.  I'm also a lot more focussed on fitness rather than body building as I get older as the last thing I want is any extra weight.


    All this skipping meals - bad news. If you do that, your body shifts into starvation mode and begins to convert ingested calories into fat stores, more than it would usually. You are better off eating regularly and particularly eating a good breakfast. I feel rank if I don't have a good start to the day.


    I think there's quite a lot of research pointing to the contrary.  Your body doesn't go into starvation mode for skipping a meal.

    You can go 72 hours without food with your metabolic rate staying the same.  I think most diets go against this principle because we're told to eat ourselves thin by the diet industry.  But if you don't want breakfast, it won't do any harm if you get your required nutrition at other meal times.

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/services/aop-cambridge-core/content/view/9B489A336FA5E425637450982AD386AD/S0007114594002151a.pdf/cardiovascular_metabolic_and_hormonal_changes_accompanying_acute_starvation_in_men_and_women.pdf

    There are actually quite a few benefits to having periods of 'not eating', decreased insulin levels and improved insulin sensitivity, increase in growth hormone.  I don't think as humans we're biologically supposed to be full of food all the time.  Obviously fasting with an otherwise health balanced diet is not to be confused with bad eaters who don't get the required nutrition by long term random meal skipping and eating the wrong things.

    I agree with almost everything you have said, but fasting can be a way of a life rather than a diet and there are tangible benefits, as long as it is controlled and with an otherwise balanced diet. 

    This is another thing that gets on my nerves a bit when it comes to nutrition (and training) - there is a lot of conflicting "evidence". I'm guilty of reading it and believing it, all and any of it tbh!

    I could dig out something that would back up what I said about fat storing, and something that would contradict it! There is good evidence though to say that eating little and often stimulates your metabolism, as opposed to fasting. And there's good evidence to say the opposite! There's evidence to say that if you want to burn fat, you need to eat more fat. And vice versa.

    Maybe it;s all malarkey and the only people that benefit from all this stuff are the publishers of Men's Health and the writers of of all these faddy books.

    But, it mostly comes down to common sense IMO. Eating isn't a science, and so it shouldnt be.

    My routine works for me, don't know if it falls into any of these 16/8, 6/4. 5/4, hoogamafilp, but it keeps me trim and well:

    up at 6, gym by 6:20, empty stomach 5 days a week, 3 days heavy weights, large muscles, 2 days highre intensity stuff and core.

    Breakfast of protein/veg/yoghurt smoothie, at around 8am
    A few nuts around 11, plain unsalted
    Lunch around 1, soup, or salad, maybe a bit of bread, yoghurt, seeds, bit of fuit. Something like that.
    Few nuts at about 4 sh
    Dinner at 7-9, could be anything, but all fresh cooked. Reasonable portion sizes, but not massive. Often spicy.
    Aim to cut out booze on weekdays, achieved with moderate to good success.
    Bed by 10:30, kipping by 11.
    Vegetarian too.



    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Sign In or Register to comment.