Help me decide on a BKP Bridge?

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  • Wilson94Wilson94 Frets: 24
    Why would you want to?

    And in reply to Bucket, no, a Rebel Yell is not like a JB or Holydiver or Classic '83. The Rebel Yell has more of an open sound. It's primarily a Hard Rock pickup that is tight enough to take a lot of gain if needed but the others don't have that open sound. I've used BKP extensively over a number of years and I swore by them. They are superb, there's no doubt about it but I learned enough about pickups over the years to then both take educated risks on other manufacturers and design my own pickups. The best neck pickup I've ever owned is in my Gibson Les Paul and it was built entirely to my specification for just £60 by Catswhiskers pickups but I only got there after many years spending a small fortune on pickups from other manufacturers. These days I know exactly what works for me so all my bridge pickups use 43AWG wire and all but one use an alnico 5 magnet. In the neck I prefer 42.5AWG wire, though I also use 42AWG and 43AWG at times. I also never get covers as I prefer the extra bite you get from open humbuckers. You would find the Holydiver a very good pickup and in mahogany, you may even prefer the Miracle Man but I think Jaime at The Creamery can make you something better and do it for a lot less money.
    Think it's either the Holy Diver or the Classic 83' to be fair which has narrowed it down a bit. It's hard to say without hearing both in comparison but the price is tempting on the Creamery ones, as you can get a fair for the price of a single BKP. Guess I need to have a think
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  • gordijigordiji Frets: 174
    Why would you want to?

    And in reply to Bucket, no, a Rebel Yell is not like a JB or Holydiver or Classic '83. The Rebel Yell has more of an open sound. It's primarily a Hard Rock pickup that is tight enough to take a lot of gain if needed but the others don't have that open sound. I've used BKP extensively over a number of years and I swore by them. They are superb, there's no doubt about it but I learned enough about pickups over the years to then both take educated risks on other manufacturers and design my own pickups. The best neck pickup I've ever owned is in my Gibson Les Paul and it was built entirely to my specification for just £60 by Catswhiskers pickups but I only got there after many years spending a small fortune on pickups from other manufacturers. These days I know exactly what works for me so all my bridge pickups use 43AWG wire and all but one use an alnico 5 magnet. In the neck I prefer 42.5AWG wire, though I also use 42AWG and 43AWG at times. I also never get covers as I prefer the extra bite you get from open humbuckers. You would find the Holydiver a very good pickup and in mahogany, you may even prefer the Miracle Man but I think Jaime at The Creamery can make you something better and do it for a lot less money.
    I agree with much said here in that you need to know what you want or know what you don't want. I now know i prefer Alnico 3 magnets in single coils having had several bkp sets with alnico 5 which produced great definition but with the catch of harsh upper mids/highs that i didn't like & it wasn't immediately apparent. If you know your specs a good winder will produce them but it takes experimenting(to know what you like) which can be expensive. 
    I love the rounded top end of the Abraxas set in my prs and are amongst my fave ever pups, the bridge being an overwound alnico 4.
    IIRC The original holydiver was more like the later rebel yell..S.Stevens took the HD & customised it to his own spec so there were two pups too close in spec and the current HD changed from its original spec which was akin to the dimarzio SD.
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  • PhilKingPhilKing Frets: 212
    The Rebel Yell was based on the 14.4k JB which was then fettled by Tim and Steve Stevens.  Originally there was an unpopular ceramic Holydiver, which Tim was revoicing anyway when Steve ordered some pickups.  Tim got in touch with him and they started working on the RY.  He borrowed my original double cream JB to check the individual coil measurements to validate his theories.  I have a set of the early prototype RY's that came to me as Holydivers, this was before Steve decided which pickup to take.

    A pickup that works really well in mahogany and can cover what you are looking at is the VHII - it's not a high output pickup, but can cover very heavy sounds.  Another one that you could also look at is the Blackhawk with Alnico magnets.  Both can give a very defined tone when you are driving them.
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  • gordijigordiji Frets: 174
    Thanks for the correction, i was speaking from memory which isn't my greatest asset !
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  • PhilKingPhilKing Frets: 212
    Don't worry, it was a long time ago and if I hadn't have a very small involvement, wouldn't have remembered all the details anyway.
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  • PhilKing said:
    The Rebel Yell was based on the 14.4k JB which was then fettled by Tim and Steve Stevens.  Originally there was an unpopular ceramic Holydiver, which Tim was revoicing anyway when Steve ordered some pickups.  Tim got in touch with him and they started working on the RY.  He borrowed my original double cream JB to check the individual coil measurements to validate his theories.  I have a set of the early prototype RY's that came to me as Holydivers, this was before Steve decided which pickup to take.

    A pickup that works really well in mahogany and can cover what you are looking at is the VHII - it's not a high output pickup, but can cover very heavy sounds.  Another one that you could also look at is the Blackhawk with Alnico magnets.  Both can give a very defined tone when you are driving them.
    Phil - it should be pointed out that the early JBs were wound with AWG43 and as Phil says in the 14-15k bracket 
    Soon after Seymour redid it with AWG44 and it clocked in at 16k+

    Not sure if they make the old version anymore however I did work with Ash at OilCity to make the "Dirty Secret" pickup which is pretty similar.
    However do try out the Oil City Blackbird , which at 13k with AWG43/A5 is in that ballpark too

    Seymour tells the story of the guitar here:
    https://www.seymourduncan.com/blog/seymour-duncan-company/the-story-of-the-tele-gib


    Jake E Lee used either the Duncan Allan Holdsworth pickup or later the Duncan JB both of which used AWG44 and alnico 5 magnets. However he did use an old P90 in an SG Junior on many recordings so you have to do some detective work to figure it all out.
    Jake is however a seriously underrated player and was as equal a talent as Rhoads in many ways - well worth a good listen.

    Many guitars have a re-sale value. Some you'll never want to sell.
    Stockist of Earvana nuts, BKP, Oil City And Monty's pickups. Sperzel, Tonepros, Gotoh and Graphtech too!
    Expert guitar repairs and upgrades - fretwork our speciality! www.felineguitars.com.  Facebook too!

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