How to learn to drum in apartment?

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stickyfiddlestickyfiddle Frets: 9443
edited March 4 in Other Instruments
I have a feeling I've had this conversation before, but starting from a postition of "does an e-kit work in an apartment".

Today, I'd like to reframe the question slightly: How can I learn to drum in any satisfying manner without getting a full kit (and in an apartment)? 

Obviously acoustic kits are out. e-kits are maybe an option, but I have no significant space I can devote to it. But I would really like something that emulates bass/snare/hat/ride at the very least. Im aware of practice pads and sample pads but concerned that they'll help me start with rudiments but not much beyond that. 

Is there any solution that might be remotely satisfying that won't take up half a room? 
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  • axisusaxisus Frets: 10942
    There are some 'relatively' small electronic drumkits. They do still give off a degree of thudding though as you are still basically hitting things. I keep mine in the garage, but it gets a lot less use due to this and I never go out in winter. The moisture is slowly killing it off as well. eDrums are a lot different to a real kit though, I couldn't play a real kit at all, I was too intimidated by the loudness!
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  • slackerslacker Frets: 947
    I've got a Roland kit in the spare bedroom. It's not that big.Mrs s doesnt complain when its being used.

    I've got a now unused real kit in the loft. There is an adjustment between the two. If the idea is to play out at some point you need to play a real kit before you start auditioning etc.imho.


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  • octatonicoctatonic Frets: 18509
    edited March 4
    As I might have mentioned (once or twice) I started drumming about 7 years ago.
    Initially it was with a DW practice kit which is basically a load of pads on a metal pole.
    This was in a London terrace and I had quite a lot of complaints & comments from people.

    The problem is the bass drum- even a pedal onto a 'silent' pad is enough to hear through walls and if you are in an apartment then the neighbour under you will quickly grow to hate you.
    It was also quite stressful for me once I knew people could hear me- it kinda tainted my practice because I knew they were irritated by the noise.

    When we moved our to the countryside it became less of an issue- I have multiple kits set up here and because we don't share walls with people I can play any of the electronic/practice kits anytime I like.
    I play acoustic kit about an hour a day, usually when people are out at work and it is therefore not a problem.
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  • EricTheWearyEricTheWeary Frets: 7205
    I know our drummer had an e kit that folded up, so it was relatively small when not in use. He could lift it all with one hand. I can't remember which one and it would be an old model by now but a quick Google suggests there are a few out there at different price points .
    Dum dum dum, dum dum de dum, dum dum dum, dum dummmm.
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  • stickyfiddlestickyfiddle Frets: 9443
    octatonic said:
    As I might have mentioned (once or twice) I started drumming about 7 years ago.
    Initially it was with a DW practice kit which is basically a load of pads on a metal pole.
    This was in a London terrace and I had quite a lot of complaints & comments from people.

    The problem is the bass drum- even a pedal onto a 'silent' pad is enough to hear through walls and if you are in an apartment then the neighbour under you will quickly grow to hate you.
    It was also quite stressful for me once I knew people could hear me- it kinda tainted my practice because I knew they were irritated by the noise.

    When we moved our to the countryside it became less of an issue- I have multiple kits set up here and because we don't share walls with people I can play any of the electronic/practice kits anytime I like.
    I play acoustic kit about an hour a day, usually when people are out at work and it is therefore not a problem.
    I had a feeling you'd say that. Obviously the best option is to move to a village in Oxfordshire :)

    I've never had a complaint about guitar but i'm well aware that melodic guitar playing is much less annoying, and I've been playing long enough that I'm not shit to listen to. That clearly wouldn't be the case with drums.  


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  • JalapenoJalapeno Frets: 3379
    Yamaha DT-Express is a tiny electronic kit
    Imagine something sharp and witty here ......

    Feedback
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  • FreebirdFreebird Frets: 971
    edited March 4
    There is a 2Box Drumkit 5 up on Gumtree.
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  • octatonicoctatonic Frets: 18509
    edited March 4
    octatonic said:
    As I might have mentioned (once or twice) I started drumming about 7 years ago.
    Initially it was with a DW practice kit which is basically a load of pads on a metal pole.
    This was in a London terrace and I had quite a lot of complaints & comments from people.

    The problem is the bass drum- even a pedal onto a 'silent' pad is enough to hear through walls and if you are in an apartment then the neighbour under you will quickly grow to hate you.
    It was also quite stressful for me once I knew people could hear me- it kinda tainted my practice because I knew they were irritated by the noise.

    When we moved our to the countryside it became less of an issue- I have multiple kits set up here and because we don't share walls with people I can play any of the electronic/practice kits anytime I like.
    I play acoustic kit about an hour a day, usually when people are out at work and it is therefore not a problem.
    I had a feeling you'd say that. Obviously the best option is to move to a village in Oxfordshire

    I've never had a complaint about guitar but i'm well aware that melodic guitar playing is much less annoying, and I've been playing long enough that I'm not shit to listen to. That clearly wouldn't be the case with drums.  
    Seriously it is a non-starter in an apartment.

    Oxfordshire is lovely, you'd like it.
    I never had any complaints about guitar either.
    Think of a bass drum pedal as a hammer- if you were hammering for hours a day then you'd have complaints.
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  • ICBMICBM Frets: 32858
    I have a feeling I've had this conversation before, but starting from a postition of "does an e-kit work in an apartment".

    Today, I'd like to reframe the question slightly: How can I learn to drum in any satisfying manner without getting a full kit (and in an apartment)? 

    Obviously acoustic kits are out. e-kits are maybe an option, but I have no significant space I can devote to it. But I would really like something that emulates bass/snare/hat/ride at the very least. Im aware of practice pads and sample pads but concerned that they'll help me start with rudiments but not much beyond that. 

    Is there any solution that might be remotely satisfying that won't take up half a room? 
    Booking time in a local rehearsal studio, if there is such a thing where you are. Obviously it will cost you per hour, but you get a full-size acoustic kit already set up and you can make as much of a racket as you like. You can even use the PA to play back any tuition material you might want to use from a laptop.

    If it doesn't work out you've lost nothing other than a bit of money, and if it does then someone will probably overhear you and ask you to join a band...

    "Take these three items, some WD-40, a vise grip, and a roll of duct tape. Any man worth his salt can fix almost any problem with this stuff alone."
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  • octatonicoctatonic Frets: 18509
    ICBM said:
    I have a feeling I've had this conversation before, but starting from a postition of "does an e-kit work in an apartment".

    Today, I'd like to reframe the question slightly: How can I learn to drum in any satisfying manner without getting a full kit (and in an apartment)? 

    Obviously acoustic kits are out. e-kits are maybe an option, but I have no significant space I can devote to it. But I would really like something that emulates bass/snare/hat/ride at the very least. Im aware of practice pads and sample pads but concerned that they'll help me start with rudiments but not much beyond that. 

    Is there any solution that might be remotely satisfying that won't take up half a room? 
    Booking time in a local rehearsal studio, if there is such a thing where you are. Obviously it will cost you per hour, but you get a full-size acoustic kit already set up and you can make as much of a racket as you like. You can even use the PA to play back any tuition material you might want to use from a laptop.

    If it doesn't work out you've lost nothing other than a bit of money, and if it does then someone will probably overhear you and ask you to join a band...

    I did this a lot when living in London.
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  • SporkySporky Frets: 13762
    edited March 4
    The only way is to kill all of your neighbours.

    Otherwise one of them will kill you. Arguably with good reason. The guitar playing has probably got them close to the edge already, and that's not a comment on your guitar playing.
    Be your own evil twin. 
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  • stickyfiddlestickyfiddle Frets: 9443
    Sporky said:
    The only way is to kill all of your neighbours.

    Otherwise one of them will kill you. Arguably with good reason. The guitar playing has probably got then closer to the edge already, and that's not a comment on your guitar playing.
    So you're saying I'd be putting them out of their misery? Interesting... ;)
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  • ChrisRGChrisRG Frets: 33
    I tried using a Yamaha e kit in my flat a few years back. Set it up, put headphones on and away I went..........

    until a day or so later I bumped into the guy living beneath my who politely asked if I’d taken up drumming!!  As previously mentioned, the kick pedal thumping away still travels unfortunately. I even tried to create a bit of padding and mass underneath the pedal but it didn’t really work.  I packed the kit up and haven’t really used it since. 
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  • SporkySporky Frets: 13762
    Sporky said:
    The only way is to kill all of your neighbours.

    Otherwise one of them will kill you. Arguably with good reason. The guitar playing has probably got then closer to the edge already, and that's not a comment on your guitar playing.
    So you're saying I'd be putting them out of their misery? Interesting... ;)
    That would certainly be an internally self-consistent interpretation of my post.
    Be your own evil twin. 
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  • FX_MunkeeFX_Munkee Frets: 1997
    I've got a Roland HD-1 v kit that the kids bash about on. As has been mentioned it's the bass pedal that still thumps. On the HD-1 it's a virtual pedal but it's still quite noticeable through a wooden floor (drums upstairs). The rest of the kit is fairly unnoticeable, so I'm still looking to make a sound isolating riser for the kit.
    Basically some MDF, tennis balls and a bit of time:-
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-9xcm-TtfM
    If you have concrete floors I reckon you'd probably get away with it.
    Shot through the heart, and you’re to blame, you give love a bad name. Not to mention archery tuition.
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