New TPS - Graham Coxon

What's Hot
2»

Comments

  • BintyTwanger77BintyTwanger77 Frets: 1245
    How did he get that momentary trem at the beginning of Oily Water, though?
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • BintyTwanger77BintyTwanger77 Frets: 1245
    That’s my type of guitar playing. Total dude.
    This is why I hated guitar magazines growing up. I wanted to play guitar like Coxon, Marr, McCabe, Butler, and all I got was multi-page features on Vai/Malmsteen etc. Graham Coxon's work has always been very much my kind of guitar playing as well.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 6reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • mixolydmixolyd Frets: 346
    That’s my type of guitar playing. Total dude.
    This is why I hated guitar magazines growing up. I wanted to play guitar like Coxon, Marr, McCabe, Butler, and all I got was multi-page features on Vai/Malmsteen etc. Graham Coxon's work has always been very much my kind of guitar playing as well.
    I had that problem too: it really held back my development for years not having access to insight on the what, why and how of popular/indie guitar music.  Now I realise that the guys writing for those magazines mostly didn’t have the insight as to what guitarists who wrote for the song were doing.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 3reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • dariusdarius Frets: 42
    That’s my type of guitar playing. Total dude.
    This is why I hated guitar magazines growing up. I wanted to play guitar like Coxon, Marr, McCabe, Butler, and all I got was multi-page features on Vai/Malmsteen etc. Graham Coxon's work has always been very much my kind of guitar playing as well.
    This bugged me too. I liked EVH, Satch, Vai and so I liked the guitar mags, but i knew i wasnt learning anything about any other type of player, which always felt narrow. Easier now of course!
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • LebarqueLebarque Frets: 938
    I thought he came across as a bumbling idiot, fumbling through his sentences and incoherently explaining how he gets his awful tone....

    Ill get my coat
    Weed. I love his approach though.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • Musicman20Musicman20 Frets: 620
    edited March 11
    That’s my type of guitar playing. Total dude.
    This is why I hated guitar magazines growing up. I wanted to play guitar like Coxon, Marr, McCabe, Butler, and all I got was multi-page features on Vai/Malmsteen etc. Graham Coxon's work has always been very much my kind of guitar playing as well.
    A fellow noise maker! Now I want to get my Tele out and just make a noise.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • mburekengemburekenge Frets: 648
    I think he under played his skills and how much he studied here.

     His technique is just too good to be random. There is a great iinterview on the Gray Guitars channel where he talks about studying Hendrix, clapton the meters etc as well as devouring Beatles songbook.

    But it was refreshing to get back to 'bigger picture' stuff rather than obsessing over the tiniest and least important gear details of the music.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • english_bobenglish_bob Frets: 2319
    darius said:
    That’s my type of guitar playing. Total dude.
    This is why I hated guitar magazines growing up. I wanted to play guitar like Coxon, Marr, McCabe, Butler, and all I got was multi-page features on Vai/Malmsteen etc. Graham Coxon's work has always been very much my kind of guitar playing as well.
    This bugged me too. I liked EVH, Satch, Vai and so I liked the guitar mags, but i knew i wasnt learning anything about any other type of player, which always felt narrow. Easier now of course!
    When I used to buy guitar magazines in the 1990s this came up in the letters section reasonably regularly. I'm sure at times the response from the editors was that they were asking for interviews, but that the interesting indie players weren't interested in giving them to the "uncool" guitar mags.

    I do remember a little one-page feature in Guitar & Bass with Graham Coxon circa "Modern Life Is Rubbish" that had a few interesting details. I think it was part of a series on contemporary indie bands. Pre-Britpop proper.

    Don't talk politics and don't throw stones. Your royal highnesses.

    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • EricTheWearyEricTheWeary Frets: 7383
    I think he under played his skills and how much he studied here.

     His technique is just too good to be random. There is a great iinterview on the Gray Guitars channel where he talks about studying Hendrix, clapton the meters etc as well as devouring Beatles songbook.

    But it was refreshing to get back to 'bigger picture' stuff rather than obsessing over the tiniest and least important gear details of the music.
    He mentions the songbooks and , I gather, his father was a music teacher so there’s more to it than just put my fingers here and see what comes out. 

    I suppose gear wise Graham uses what he has found works for him after a long journey to get there and that’s what he was describing.
    Dum dum dum, dum dum de dum, dum dum dum, dum dummmm.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • kjdowdkjdowd Frets: 630
    dindude said:
    Great to see someone a bit different to the norm on TPS, always loved Coxon, but seriously Dan and Mick were out of their depth. Seemed their reference points stretched no further than hearing Coffe and TV and Song 2 on the radio - there’s so much more that should have been explored if they’d known their stuff (I for one could have filled 2hours of questions just on Modern Life is Rubbish related stuff) - very frustrating. 
    Same here, Modern Life is their best I think. When a guitarist that good shows they really aren't into fancy gear that much, it makes you think.
    He's a song writer.
    That's the biggest difference, a typical guitarist looks at his part and his sound etc but tends to forget the more important things around him like the song it's self, complementing what the rhythm section is doing and something I've rarely ever seen with other guitarists, not playing all the time.
    Music should be about note choice and composition first and foremost, not handwand boutique pickups with bumble bee caps and tonewoods going through lava cables into your kot and Marshall half stack etc

    I'll get back in my box
    Absolutely spot on. I see it in my own playing and approach (albeit as an amateur and part timer). I play in two main bands - one an originals band in which I write the songs and one a tribute band where I’m purely the lead guitarist. In the former I have a minimal setup and the guitar parts are pretty straightforward and totally serve the song and in the latter the gear is more complicated - and ever changing - and I focus more on the pure guitar playing aspects. I guess it’s about finding your expression and priorities in the given context, although in actuality both should be the same. The guitar should serve the song and the gear should be what it needs to be and nothing more. 
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • impmannimpmann Frets: 7535
    I thought he came across as a bumbling idiot, fumbling through his sentences and incoherently explaining how he gets his awful tone....

    Ill get my coat
    Hmm, you mean he didn't speak in soundbites about how his sound is reliant on a blues-rock tone based on the use of premium vintage equipment that went out of date with the death of Paul Kossoff like all the other boring old farts? At least he doesn't sound like Mascis, who sounds like a retarded Gibbon after smoking a bag of skunk - and his speaking voice isn't much better, either.

    And for the record - Graham stopped drinking/other recreational habits a long time ago, because it was killing him (literally). He is 100% in a better place mentally than at any point of the 90s.


    Never Ever Bloody Anything Ever.

    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 7reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • freakboy1610freakboy1610 Frets: 756
    At least he doesn't sound like Mascis, who sounds like a retarded Gibbon after smoking a bag of skunk - and his speaking voice isn't much better, either.
    :o
    Link to my trading feedback
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • meltedbuzzboxmeltedbuzzbox Frets: 7856
    The Bigsby was the first successful design of what is now called a whammy bar or tremolo arm, although vibrato is the technically correct term for the musical effect it produces. In standard usage, tremolo is a rapid fluctuation of the volume of a note, while vibrato is a fluctuation in pitch. The origin of this nonstandard usage of the term by electric guitarists is attributed to Leo Fender, who also used the term “vibrato” to refer to what is really a tremolo effect.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11788
    How did he get that momentary trem at the beginning of Oily Water, though?
    @bintytwanger77

    "Any favourites? It was imperative that I had a tremolo, coz I love tremolo sounds, and a flanger. It was always Boss that would do these in an easy to use, and instantly gratifying way. I’ve recently got into Chorus pedals. On an early blur track called Oily Water, I tremoloed two guitar tracks at different rates. At one point, for one beat of the bar there’s quite a woozy effect. I guess it’s from my liking for progressive rock and psychedelic music."

    http://www.roland.co.uk/blog/graham-coxon-interview/
    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11788
    When I used to buy guitar magazines in the 1990s this came up in the letters section reasonably regularly. I'm sure at times the response from the editors was that they were asking for interviews, but that the interesting indie players weren't interested in giving them to the "uncool" guitar mags.

    I do remember a little one-page feature in Guitar & Bass with Graham Coxon circa "Modern Life Is Rubbish" that had a few interesting details. I think it was part of a series on contemporary indie bands. Pre-Britpop proper.
    And then Britpop came and there were interviews in the Guitar Magazine. Martin Carr of the Boo radleys, Richard Oakes and Bernard Butler after he left Suede, I think Miki and Emma from Lush, the Bluetones, the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Edwyn Collins, Reef, Ride... Guitar World had a few as well as I distinctly remember a Pavement interview. 

    (Edit: yes! Guitar World and Pavement)
    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • english_bobenglish_bob Frets: 2319
    When I used to buy guitar magazines in the 1990s this came up in the letters section reasonably regularly. I'm sure at times the response from the editors was that they were asking for interviews, but that the interesting indie players weren't interested in giving them to the "uncool" guitar mags.

    I do remember a little one-page feature in Guitar & Bass with Graham Coxon circa "Modern Life Is Rubbish" that had a few interesting details. I think it was part of a series on contemporary indie bands. Pre-Britpop proper.
    And then Britpop came and there were interviews in the Guitar Magazine. Martin Carr of the Boo radleys, Richard Oakes and Bernard Butler after he left Suede, I think Miki and Emma from Lush, the Bluetones, the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Edwyn Collins, Reef, Ride... Guitar World had a few as well as I distinctly remember a Pavement interview. 

    (Edit: yes! Guitar World and Pavement)

    In fairness, the magazine I usually read (and probably saw those complaint letters in) was Guitarist. I don't know whether it was entirely honest, a result of not knowing the right people to get in touch with the players, or just a better story than "we don't give a shit so we aren't even asking".

    Don't talk politics and don't throw stones. Your royal highnesses.

    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11788
    I think I only ever bought three issues of Guitarist: a Clapton special, the one with Gary Moore's Les Paul in it (fuck knows why), and the first time they put Bernard Butler on the front cover. Even the novice guitarist in me realised that the music they covered wasn't what I was into.. :)
    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • StuartMac290StuartMac290 Frets: 655
    Guitarist has always been embarrassingly clueless about pretty much any music that didn't fit into its tiny, tiny guitar-centric view of the music industry. The album reviews focussed on stuff that 99.9% of the people who buy records (rightly) don't give a shit about.

    I think the low point for me was when Simon Bradley reviewed a Rickenbacker 330 - by any standards one of THE classic guitars - and gave it a stinker of a score whilst moaning that you couldn't shred on it. I mean for fuck's sake! If there was ever a way of demonstrating precisely why you'd never become a successful guitar player that was it right there.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Sign In or Register to comment.