Jockey Full of Bourbon

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JerkMoansJerkMoans Frets: 1212
I suspect there's been a ton of these threads over the years but what the hey: it's 2018, kids!  Let's share the funk!

Having spent the last couple of weeks on Angus Young I fancied a change, so we have the most excellent Marc Ribot playing on Tom Waits' 'Jockey Full of Bourbon'.  If anyone has learned this I'd love to chew the fat and discuss...

Here's the original:



Self-confessed Blues Lawyer
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  • DrCorneliusDrCornelius Frets: 767
    Subscribed !
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  • mistercharliemistercharlie Frets: 262
    Right now I’m learning Marc Ribot’s solo on the live version of Telephone Call from Istanbul. His work with Tom Waits is fantastic. Part old-timey carnival, part Arabic.

    It also seems like there’s nothing to it, until you play the parts that is. They sound so simple, but they have some really neat rhythms that are so musical and catchy. This will sound odd, but in that respect he reminds me of Mark Knopfler—solos and melodies based on chords, with inventive rhythms. 

    <iframe width="640" height="360" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
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  • LebarqueLebarque Frets: 750
    Yep, we did a cover of Bourbon once. Great song and great fun to play.
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  • Right now I’m learning Marc Ribot’s solo on the live version of Telephone Call from Istanbul. His work with Tom Waits is fantastic. Part old-timey carnival, part Arabic.

    It also seems like there’s nothing to it, until you play the parts that is. They sound so simple, but they have some really neat rhythms that are so musical and catchy. This will sound odd, but in that respect he reminds me of Mark Knopfler—solos and melodies based on chords, with inventive rhythms. 

    <iframe width="640" height="360" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    What a great guitar sound! Is that a Selmer TnB?
    Give a man a fire and he's warm for the day. But set fire to him and he's warm for the rest of his life
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  • mistercharliemistercharlie Frets: 262
    He goes through his his gear in another video. It’s a 1484 Silvertone, and a couple of Strymon pedals. 
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  • JerkMoansJerkMoans Frets: 1212
    Right now I’m learning Marc Ribot’s solo on the live version of Telephone Call from Istanbul. His work with Tom Waits is fantastic. Part old-timey carnival, part Arabic.

    It also seems like there’s nothing to it, until you play the parts that is. They sound so simple, but they have some really neat rhythms that are so musical and catchy. This will sound odd, but in that respect he reminds me of Mark Knopfler—solos and melodies based on chords, with inventive rhythms. 

    <iframe width="640" height="360" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    That is all kinds of super cool. Bits of Django in there. Bits of all sorts. Think Marc Ribot is gonna be my new guitar obsession.
    Self-confessed Blues Lawyer
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  • Love jockey full of bourbon and telephone call from Istanbul, but my personal favourite bits of Ribot's work with Waits are on the Real Gone album. Especially Hoist That Rag and Make It Rain.




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  • JerkMoansJerkMoans Frets: 1212
    Great lesson here.  So what is this?  E harmonic minor, with variations (I stress I know eff all of theory, just trying to figure out where to start...)





    Self-confessed Blues Lawyer
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  • Winny_PoohWinny_Pooh Frets: 2477
    Ribot is a huge fan of Arsenio Rodriguez.
    If you play along to Cuban music, add some skronk blues and a bit of chromaticism you can get where he's coming from on Rain Dogs. I also like the stuff he does on the Raising Sand album.
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  • DottoreDottore Frets: 50
    Eric Haugen is great. His musical taste is impeccable (to me, anyway) and he has a very easy and approachable manner. Triffic guitar player as well.

    You need an idea of what you are going to do, but it should be a vague idea.

    My feedback page: http://www.thefretboard.co.uk/discussion/91654/
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  • mistercharliemistercharlie Frets: 262
    Dottore said:
    Eric Haugen is great. His musical taste is impeccable (to me, anyway) and he has a very easy and approachable manner. Triffic guitar player as well.
    His “play it 3 times, slower each time” demo method is great, too. Easily the best way (for me anyway) to get a song quickly.
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  • JerkMoansJerkMoans Frets: 1212
    Well Ribot / Haugen fans, now I’ve more or less nailed ‘Jockey’, here’s the next challenge I’ve set myself... Anyone else had a crack?

    https://youtu.be/vym6JjgmPxY

    Self-confessed Blues Lawyer
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