Autumn general election - Tories on war footing

What's Hot
Just heard my local Tory association has cleared the decks for an October election. Looks like May's going to have another go at getting a majority. Makes sense given the Brexit mess and Ireland issue.
My pump-action drivel gun is smoking hot today!
0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
«134

Comments

  • stickyfiddlestickyfiddle Frets: 9442
    Why would she think she'll do any better this time? 

    What a joke.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 2reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • ChalkyChalky Frets: 5661
    Cue anti-Tory rants.

    Cue anti-media rants to explain why Jeremy is lagging in the polls.

    Cue Brexit rants.

    Action!
    0reaction image LOL 1reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • KilgoreKilgore Frets: 1145
    Excellent news!

    The people must be heard. I'll be voting for that nice Mr Clegg again.
    2reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • ICBMICBM Frets: 32822
    edited May 21
    Maybe she actually wants to lose, so she can let Corbyn try to sort out the Brexit mess without having to admit she doesn’t have a clue.

    I can't think of any other reason she would willingly put the country through all this again... although I hope she does.
    "Take these three items, some WD-40, a vise grip, and a roll of duct tape. Any man worth his salt can fix almost any problem with this stuff alone."
    1reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 2reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • marantz1300marantz1300 Frets: 1504
    edited May 21
    maybe she knows  there's some awful shit coming next year and a Nov election is her only chance of staying in power
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • FretwiredFretwired Frets: 16962
    I don't think she'll have a choice. The Tory Remainers aim to bring her down. Looks like a Tory civil war in the offing.

    From today's Times:

    Conservative MPs are preparing for another snap general election as they fear the Brexit deadlock will become insurmountable for the prime minister.

    Some have spoken to their local party associations asking to be readopted as prospective parliamentary candidates in readiness for an autumn election.

    The back-bench MPs acted after meeting Theresa May last week for a private Brexit briefing as she tried to stop a row over Britain’s future customs relationship with the European Union tearing the party apart.

    But far from being reassured by meeting the prime minister, they left Downing Street convinced that another election could be around the corner.

    One Tory Brexiteer said he could not see how the government could “square the circle” and come up with a solution on Britain’s future trading relationship with the EU that would appease both sides of the warring party.

    “It’s becoming clear there’s no compromise that will keep remainers such as Nicky Morgan, Anna Soubry and Dominic Grieve happy as well as the likes of myself and Jacob Rees-Mogg,” the MP said.

    “The numbers are against us and if we face repeated defeats when the withdrawal bill returns to the Commons, the only alternative will be to kick over the table and trigger a vote of no confidence in the prime minister, which will likely lead to another general election.

    “After speaking with like-minded colleagues, I have raised this with my association chairman and asked them to get on with readopting me as the candidate in my seat in anticipation that we could go to the polls as early as the autumn. I am even preparing my first leaflet drop for the summer.”

    Labour MPs are also discussing the prospect of an October poll. A Labour Party insider said: “I heard two separate reports from MPs who said they had heard Conservative MPs planning for an early election.”

    The revelation will heap further pressure on May, who is facing a backlash over her plans to keep the whole of the UK tied to a customs union with the EU after 2021, or until an alternative to a hard border in Ireland can be found.

    Eurosceptics fear the proposal could lead to Britain being tied to the customs union indefinitely.

    Rees-Mogg, the leader of a 60-strong group of Eurosceptic Tory MPs, has condemned the idea as “perpetual purgatory”. Andrew Bridgen, another member of the European Research Group, said: “If the plan is staying tied to a customs union until we find something better, the EU will never offer us anything better and we will never get out.”

    At least a dozen hardline Brexiteers think leaving the EU with no deal would be better, according to reports. They are expected to renew calls for the appointment of a “no deal” cabinet minister to show that Britain is prepared to walk away from the negotiations.

    However, in his last speech as the president of the Confederation of British Industry, Paul Drechsler will back calls for Britain to remain in the customs union.

    At the CBI annual dinner on Tuesday, he will say: “We need to break the Brexit logjam and fast because there’s so much more that we need to get on with. A pragmatic decision to be in a customs union with the EU would allow us to move on.

    “We can then use the exceptional talent within our civil service, the drive of business and the energy of our political leadership to tackle the root causes of low productivity and unacceptable regional inequality in our country. These are the goals that really matter.”

    My pump-action drivel gun is smoking hot today!
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • domforrdomforr Frets: 163
    For someone so cautious and unimaginative Theresa may like to take high-risk gambles it seems.  What will it achieve if she remains in the same position as last time?  She'll either have to achieve a clear majority or resign I would think, as another DUP coalition would be unacceptable to the public after going through another election.

    The real question is whether the Labour party will finally break cover over Brexit, or whether the current ambiguity remains. My feeling is that that the 'all things to all people position' is no longer viable and will actually do them more harm than good. 
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • FretwiredFretwired Frets: 16962
    And don't write off Corbyn.

    From the Telegraph:

    Jeremy Corbyn hasn't peaked - he is not as unelectable as you think


    For someone whose name was apparently only included on the leadership ballot to “open up debate”, Jeremy Corbyn is doing unbelievably well. Labour’s underwhelming performance at this month’s local elections has seen some breathing a sigh of relief that he has reached his peak and is unelectable, but all signs suggest otherwise.

    His simple message – that every problem can be solved by a good dose of the state – is becoming part of the mainstream narrative. To counter this, the Conservatives need an equally simple defence of market forces, but it is a rare thing these days to see a minister making the case for economic liberalism with the same passion Corbyn has for statism. The re-nationalisation of the East Coast railway is the latest example of the Conservatives adopting, rather than challenging the Opposition’s policies. Unable or unwilling to work out a private sector solution and demonstrate the power of free markets, they have again opted to impose the burden of a failing industry on taxpayers.

    When Corbyn was elected as leader in 2015, he and his shadow chancellor John McDonnell were barely taken seriously, but then came Brexit, and then the disastrous 2017 election: Corbyn didn’t win, but he upset the apple cart. The Tories losing their majority was enough to lend his team credibility.

    Two years ago, no one could have imagined that McDonnell would be attending Davos this year to tell the attendees that he didn’t think they “have any comprehension of the contempt in which they are held”. But with the shaken-up establishment unable to work out which would upset their world order the least – Brexit or a Corbyn government – his rhetoric and ideas cannot be dismissed so easily anymore. McDonnell now has a seat at the table.

    Many City veterans used to say to me: “Brexit doesn’t keep me up at night, the thought of a Corbyn government does,” but they seem to have lately changed their tune, thanks to the rumours doing the rounds that the civil service is preventing the Government from implementing its Brexit policy.

    Corbyn’s clever politicking around Brexit has planted the idea that he could stop it from happening if Theresa May fails to see us over the finish line before the next election. Again, May should be setting out a bold vision for leaving the EU that challenges Labour's muddled messages, but instead she has lost control of the narrative.

    The Davos patrons may not like the idea of a Corbyn government, but seem to have decided they could learn to work with him.

    These days, the largely Remain-supporting City is convinced that the civil service will act as a buffer against his more radical policies, protecting the economy from any lasting harm, while keeping us in the EU. This is a dangerous gamble because the civil service cannot obfuscate the will of a determined government.

    In the ideological vacuum created by the Tories, aided by weak leadership and a dragging of feet on Brexit, the Conservatives run the risk of alienating every single one of their traditional voter groups. That is when Corbyn could truly peak; his opponents write him off at their own peril.


    My pump-action drivel gun is smoking hot today!
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11476
    Fretwired said:
    I don't think she'll have a choice. The Tory Remainers aim to bring her down. Looks like a Tory civil war in the offing.

    From today's Times:

    ----

    But far from being reassured by meeting the prime minister, they left Downing Street convinced that another election could be around the corner.

    One Tory Brexiteer said he could not see how the government could “square the circle” and come up with a solution on Britain’s future trading relationship with the EU that would appease both sides of the warring party.

    “It’s becoming clear there’s no compromise that will keep remainers such as Nicky Morgan, Anna Soubry and Dominic Grieve happy as well as the likes of myself and Jacob Rees-Mogg,” the MP said.

    “The numbers are against us and if we face repeated defeats when the withdrawal bill returns to the Commons, the only alternative will be to kick over the table and trigger a vote of no confidence in the prime minister, which will likely lead to another general election.




    It's a cracking threat piece from the ST, isn't it? 

    The Conservatives are a split party. There's no doubt about that. But I wonder how much they really want a vote of no confidence. Such an action whether she won or lost would be a very visible public display of lack of unity within the party. For the Leavers, they should be mindful that the vote of no confidence in Corbyn two years ago didn't have the desired effect for the Blairites and ended up making the leader's position stronger. If such a situation occurred with May, it would weaken the Leavers considerably. 

    I get the sense the Hard Leavers are feeling very threatened at the minute. 
    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11476
    Fretwired said:
    And don't write off Corbyn.

    From the Telegraph:

    Jeremy Corbyn hasn't peaked - he is not as unelectable as you think


    For someone whose name was apparently only included on the leadership ballot to “open up debate”, Jeremy Corbyn is doing unbelievably well. Labour’s underwhelming performance at this month’s local elections has seen some breathing a sigh of relief that he has reached his peak and is unelectable, but all signs suggest otherwise.

    His simple message – that every problem can be solved by a good dose of the state – is becoming part of the mainstream narrative. To counter this, the Conservatives need an equally simple defence of market forces, but it is a rare thing these days to see a minister making the case for economic liberalism with the same passion Corbyn has for statism. The re-nationalisation of the East Coast railway is the latest example of the Conservatives adopting, rather than challenging the Opposition’s policies. Unable or unwilling to work out a private sector solution and demonstrate the power of free markets, they have again opted to impose the burden of a failing industry on taxpayers.



    The Telegraph is wonderfully fun. 

    "His simple message – that every problem can be solved by a good dose of the state – is becoming part of the mainstream narrative. To counter this, the Conservatives need an equally simple defence of market forces, but it is a rare thing these days to see a minister making the case for economic liberalism with the same passion Corbyn has for statism."

    Maybe because it's hard to make a passionate defence of market forces when they keep fucking up. We've had a number of years of public sector austerity. Hospitals and schools are stretched, the military has suffered, state assets sold off on the cheap. Under Cameron the notion was that the private sector would be the way forward. 

    Now we see the private sector cutting jobs in so many sectors. Large firms cutting back on stores, people worried about their employment future, the threat of AI and greater mechanisation taking jobs away. Poverty may be reduced but the chance to move further and go on to better things has undoubtedly been reduced. It isn't hard to see why a state-led approach has come back in fashion. 

    The Corbyn socialist approach appeals to many because they've seen or heard about the Thatcher-New Labour-Cameron years. Mostly policies along the same lines, a country governed by parties whose leaders took the country into wars and military conflicts. A socialist leader who preaches peace and is avowedly against military action unless absolutely necessary is going to stand out.  
    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 2reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • hywelghywelg Frets: 1532
    It is just Remainer Tories sabre rattling, raising the prospect of an election and their willingness to commit electoral suicide in persuit of staying in, in an attempt to get May to adopt their vision of a UK outside the EU. i.e. still, in all but name, IN. I hope UKIP are ready :)

    4reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • FretwiredFretwired Frets: 16962
    hywelg said:
    It is just Remainer Tories sabre rattling, raising the prospect of an election and their willingness to commit electoral suicide in persuit of staying in, in an attempt to get May to adopt their vision of a UK outside the EU. i.e. still, in all but name, IN. I hope UKIP are ready :)

    UKIP are finished. It takes money to run an election - they have none. It could be a smart move by May if she breaks cover and campaigns for a soft Brexit. It would force Labour to either back her or articulate their vision for the future which they're currently not doing. Whatever happens this government won't do a full term.
    My pump-action drivel gun is smoking hot today!
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • scrumhalfscrumhalf Frets: 4941
    Corbyn isn't the problem. If he gets elected then there will be a bait-and-switch operation to get ther Quartermaster into no 10. They did it with the GLC, when Andrew Macintosh was ousted after winning the election and Livingstone took over.

    But another election? Take all of the prospective coverage, stick it on a subscription channel until the last week before the election then allow each of the major parties five minutes a day with their genitals wired up to the mains.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11476
    hywelg said:
    It is just Remainer Tories sabre rattling, raising the prospect of an election and their willingness to commit electoral suicide in persuit of staying in, in an attempt to get May to adopt their vision of a UK outside the EU. i.e. still, in all but name, IN. I hope UKIP are ready :)


    Article in Leave-backing Sunday newspaper edited by friend of Gove that quotes prominent Leaver = "It is just Remainer Tories sabre rattling". 

    Laughable as ever, sir. 
    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11476
    Fretwired said:
    UKIP are finished. It takes money to run an election - they have none. It could be a smart move by May if she breaks cover and campaigns for a soft Brexit. It would force Labour to either back her or articulate their vision for the future which they're currently not doing. Whatever happens this government won't do a full term.
    Aye. It does put the onus on Labour to actually define what they stand for regarding the EU. If they go full hard, then there is a clear risk of alienating the young. If they go soft or remain, then they risk alienating the older voters. 

    Jeez, which split party to vote for? The free market one who don't agree internally or the socialist one who don't agree internally...
    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • ICBMICBM Frets: 32822
    hywelg said:
    It is just Remainer Tories sabre rattling, raising the prospect of an election and their willingness to commit electoral suicide in persuit of staying in, in an attempt to get May to adopt their vision of a UK outside the EU. i.e. still, in all but name, IN.
    It's exactly the opposite. It's a narrow-minded, aggressive minority of hardline Leavers threatening to throw their toys out of the pram and bring down their own party because they aren't going to get what they demand.
    "Take these three items, some WD-40, a vise grip, and a roll of duct tape. Any man worth his salt can fix almost any problem with this stuff alone."
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 6reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11476
    ICBM said:
    hywelg said:
    It is just Remainer Tories sabre rattling, raising the prospect of an election and their willingness to commit electoral suicide in persuit of staying in, in an attempt to get May to adopt their vision of a UK outside the EU. i.e. still, in all but name, IN.
    It's exactly the opposite. It's a narrow-minded, aggressive minority of hardline Leavers threatening to throw their toys out of the pram and bring down their own party because they aren't going to get what they demand.

    It really is time to put up or shut up for a number of elements. We're close to two years on from the referendum and there is still no absolute path determined. We have a Prime Minister who is clearly moving away from the ethos of her Lancaster House speech yet won't give out the truth. We have a load of blue Leavers talking of votes of no confidence, a load of blue Remainers saying they have the numbers to win out. The Labour Momentum kiddies want their second referendum, the older folk are saying no. 

    Perhaps a May resignation followed by a leadership contest is the way forward. Before she convince an electorate, she needs to convince her own party. 
    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • FretwiredFretwired Frets: 16962

    It really is time to put up or shut up for a number of elements. We're close to two years on from the referendum and there is still no absolute path determined. We have a Prime Minister who is clearly moving away from the ethos of her Lancaster House speech yet won't give out the truth. We have a load of blue Leavers talking of votes of no confidence, a load of blue Remainers saying they have the numbers to win out. The Labour Momentum kiddies want their second referendum, the older folk are saying no. 

    Perhaps a May resignation followed by a leadership contest is the way forward. Before she convince an electorate, she needs to convince her own party. 
    I'm not so sure. I think May and the EU have an idea of the final deal and like a well-drilled Italian football team they are running the clock down to the point that at the 11th hour the only deal is to remain as a full member or in the Customs Union. May is a remainer.
    My pump-action drivel gun is smoking hot today!
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11476
    And yet as I write put up or shut up, what do we have today? A new think tank, Onward, was launched. 

    https://www.politicshome.com/news/uk/political-parties/conservative-party/news/95339/conservative-party-must-widen-appeal-beyond

    Hurrah! Another think tank designed to learn about people that will operate within its own little vacuum! The jokes about socialists always having meetings to decide the simple things are legendary but think tanks are exactly the same. We have plenty of tanks a'thinkin but no direct course of action that has been delivered to the public. 

    Onward gave its first interview to George Eaton in the New Statesman last week and one bit really stood out. The quote is from Neil O'Brien, Conservative MP and former head of Policy Exchange. 

    "Perhaps complacently, O’Brien asserted that “the intellectual life is on the centre right. I don’t see a lot of life on the centre left, there’s definitely no life on the Corbynite left – it is the same people and the same ideas from the 1980s.”

    When a think tank founder is that blinkered that they can't see how Corbyn has cut across a number of age groups and positions, when he can't see the intelligent and rational arguments that do exist on the left side, then it isn't a wonder why they need a think tank to figure out how to get in touch with the people. 
    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11476
    Fretwired said:

    It really is time to put up or shut up for a number of elements. We're close to two years on from the referendum and there is still no absolute path determined. We have a Prime Minister who is clearly moving away from the ethos of her Lancaster House speech yet won't give out the truth. We have a load of blue Leavers talking of votes of no confidence, a load of blue Remainers saying they have the numbers to win out. The Labour Momentum kiddies want their second referendum, the older folk are saying no. 

    Perhaps a May resignation followed by a leadership contest is the way forward. Before she convince an electorate, she needs to convince her own party. 
    I'm not so sure. I think May and the EU have an idea of the final deal and like a well-drilled Italian football team they are running the clock down to the point that at the 11th hour the only deal is to remain as a full member or in the Customs Union. May is a remainer.
    May is no Franco Baresi or Paolo Maldini, that's for sure...

    Undoubtedly she is a Remainer. That's why I mentioned Lancaster House, the stance she seems to have now is removed from the core of that speech. It would just be rather nice to have some definitive action from someone on something. Fuck it, a Leaver vote of no confidence would be fun. Force a leadership contest, force a GE, whatever :)


    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • FretwiredFretwired Frets: 16962
    Fretwired said:

    It really is time to put up or shut up for a number of elements. We're close to two years on from the referendum and there is still no absolute path determined. We have a Prime Minister who is clearly moving away from the ethos of her Lancaster House speech yet won't give out the truth. We have a load of blue Leavers talking of votes of no confidence, a load of blue Remainers saying they have the numbers to win out. The Labour Momentum kiddies want their second referendum, the older folk are saying no. 

    Perhaps a May resignation followed by a leadership contest is the way forward. Before she convince an electorate, she needs to convince her own party. 
    I'm not so sure. I think May and the EU have an idea of the final deal and like a well-drilled Italian football team they are running the clock down to the point that at the 11th hour the only deal is to remain as a full member or in the Customs Union. May is a remainer.
    May is no Franco Baresi or Paolo Maldini, that's for sure...

    Undoubtedly she is a Remainer. That's why I mentioned Lancaster House, the stance she seems to have now is removed from the core of that speech. It would just be rather nice to have some definitive action from someone on something. Fuck it, a Leaver vote of no confidence would be fun. Force a leadership contest, force a GE, whatever :)


    Ultimately something will give .. May can't realistically get much through Parliament as she doesn't have a majority so I can't see how any Brexit bill will get through the Lords and the Commons without a ton of fudge and compromise which will please nobody.
    My pump-action drivel gun is smoking hot today!
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • OctafishOctafish Frets: 1041


    ...."Perhaps complacently, O’Brien asserted that “the intellectual life is on the centre right. I don’t see a lot of life on the centre left, there’s definitely no life on the Corbynite left – it is the same people and the same ideas from the 1980s.”

    When a think tank founder is that blinkered that they can't see how Corbyn has cut across a number of age groups and positions, when he can't see the intelligent and rational arguments that do exist on the left side, then it isn't a wonder why they need a think tank to figure out how to get in touch with the people. 
    Same complaceny that lead Cameron to think he could wing a yes vote in the EU referendum and Maybot's general election disaster.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11476
    @Octafish there are plenty of areas of the current Labour machine that demand criticism (seeing some shit yesterday from party members supporting Maduro in Venezuela was incredible). So ignoring the content, you have to look at the way Labour and Momentum and all these groups have done it. It's pretty damn simple really, a lot of shoe leather, a lot of small meetings building into something bigger. The right-wing think tanks and lobby groups are very good at understanding trends and how this could translate into campaigns to reach people. You had that in the referendum with Vote Leave. For all of their lies and bullshit, they knew how to communicate those most effectively to people in order to get their support. I'm not condoning the message here, just commenting on the delivery. 

    Momentum and Labour aren't quite like that. The delivery is not the result of hours and hours of think tank research and number crunching. Jeremy Corbyn doesn't dress like that because it's been deduced that 56.5% of the 18-24 population trust a man more if he doesn't wear a tie. There is an approachable nature to Corbyn. I've written on this forum before about seeing him in Bristol a few years ago. After the rally ended, I went back to Temple Meads station. Corbyn was there with Abbott and Seamus Milne, no handlers or spads or security in sight. They had about 10 minutes to the next train back to London. Corbyn ended up sat on a bench with two older ladies and they talked away for about 10 minutes. The openness to engage was remarkable at the time and I thought of witnessing that exchange a lot when it came to the last election and seeing our Prime Minister scurrying away from any contact with the population. The best way to understand how to get your message to the people is to go and talk to the people, not to bury yourself in a central London office with a load of people who did PPE at Oxbridge. 


    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11476
    Fretwired said:
    Ultimately something will give .. May can't realistically get much through Parliament as she doesn't have a majority so I can't see how any Brexit bill will get through the Lords and the Commons without a ton of fudge and compromise which will please nobody.
    It just has to break at some point. I haven't felt this for a long time but I'm actually looking forward to PMQs this week. 
    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • Axe_meisterAxe_meister Frets: 2210
    A general election before Brexit will be political suicide for the Conservative party and for the country as a whole might as well start the negotiation from scratch.
    A leadership challenge will ensure the Tories loose at the next election after Brexit.
    Does the right wing of the Conservative party know how much damage they are inflicting on a party that is already in a very fragile position?

    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • ICBMICBM Frets: 32822

    Does the right wing of the Conservative party know how much damage they are inflicting on a party that is already in a very fragile position?
    Almost certainly, but they're so convinced they're right that it trumps that. It's not a rational position, it's a quasi-religious belief - the cries of 'betrayal' when they think they're not going to get their own way is a symptom of that. Their bluff needs to be called one way or the other... compromise isn't possible.
    "Take these three items, some WD-40, a vise grip, and a roll of duct tape. Any man worth his salt can fix almost any problem with this stuff alone."
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 2reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • FretwiredFretwired Frets: 16962
    edited May 21
    Now the Telegraph ...

    Three reasons we are very likely to have another general election within the next 18 months


    The Government is paralysed, and everyone is getting worried

    After the botched 2017 General Election, which saw the Conservative Party lose its majority, the last thing this Government wants is another one – at least not until 2022. But the feeling is growing that one is inevitably coming, and within the next 18 months.

    Many MPs will view this prospect with as much enthusiasm as a chicken with a fox in her henhouse. For many more than usual, on both sides of the House of Commons, the outcome of an election is far from certain. So, like the chickens, a mixture of panic and fear will be the dominant emotions.

    Their comfort blanket will be the Fixed Term Parliaments Act 2011, which made it much harder to force an unwilling government into a General Election. MPs often cite the two-thirds majority it takes (434 MPs) to call an early election, forgetting that the Act also provides for a vote of no confidence that can also trigger an early election if a further vote of confidence can't be provided within 14 days.

    Despite the legislation, there are three reasons why I believe a general election in the next 18 months is probable.

    First, with no certain majority in the House of Commons and the House of Lords forcing votes on all the most controversial elements of Brexit in the EU Withdrawal Bill, there is a very real possibility (even likelihood) that the governance of Britain will simply spiral out of control. Remainer peers have voted, often openly, with a desire to bring about a change of policy on the EU or even a change of government. 

    It is all part of the same phenomena that recently saw mainstream Remainers publicly admitting that the Brexit vote had sent them "slightly mad". Mathew Parris and Yasmin Alibhai-Brown are self-declared, but one only has to take a short trawl through Twitter to view the frothing madness that exists.

    For these people the rejection of their liberal and fashionable dinner party views by a majority of the country took them by surprise and is unconscionable. Rejection is hard to deal with in politics, but for Remainers everything they believed about themselves, their friends and the wider UK was trampled in one night.  So one can understand where this form of madness and political intolerance originates.

    In a divided country this creates a giant problem for the Government. Trying to talk sensible compromise to people who have a collective blind-spot, who are seized by irrationality, whose only political desire seems to be to put things back the way they were before the referendum, can only end up in one place: chaos.

    It does not take a leap of the imagination to see how an alliance of Remainers would relish an early general election to stop the UK from leaving at least the Single Market or the Customs Union, if not the EU itself. Bringing down the Government and an early general election would be to the only way to justify it and create the political space for a second referendum.

    This would be harder to achieve if the Government was about more than Brexit. But it is playing into the hands of its enemies, and this is my second reason for expecting a general election.

    Current political uncertainty is beginning to damage the economy, more so than Brexit. Business is not as worried by Brexit as some would have us believe; many business leaders just want to get on with it and have the issue settled. But they also see a yawning absence of a positive and exciting economic agenda for business – one such as the USA is pursuing.

    There is also no substantial or concerted action in the area of social reform, despite the desperate need for it. If this uncertainty and malaise continues, influential business leaders will increasingly call for a general election to give someone a decisive mandate to lead the country – whatever the direction.

    Finally, the local elections confirmed what many Conservatives felt instinctively: that Jeremy Corbyn’s brand of Labour, up against the right Tory campaign and policies, is eminently beatable. It is now clear that large parts of the country fear this nasty brand of Marxist, creating an opening for the current political gridlock to be broken.

    Conservative MPs who have seen this in their local areas may yet remain reluctant to go to the electorate, but as the problems mount and the Brexit supporters expect becomes harder to deliver, keeping that support on board will become more difficult. An early election so that the country can make a decisive decision on its future direction may not then be so unattractive.

    Indeed, in light of all these circumstances, a confluence could appear within the Conservative Party that will make an early election inevitable. So to Brenda from Bristol, who famously declared “not another one!” when told of the 2017 General Election, I am sorry to say: get ready, because another one is heading your way.

    Rob Wilson is the former Conservative MP for Reading East (author of the above)

    My pump-action drivel gun is smoking hot today!
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HeartfeltdawnHeartfeltdawn Frets: 11476

    Does the right wing of the Conservative party know how much damage they are inflicting on a party that is already in a very fragile position?

    Yes but the idea is that they can then come in and repair the damage that they have made because there is a sizeable number of voters who want a hardcore Tory Leave leadership. After all, they've seen the formerly fringe element of Labour come in and take over so why not a more hardcore Tory leadership? 

    The difference there is that Corbyn came to power after a lengthy Bair period that ended in Labour being discredited through financial failings, a lot of skullduggery, and the small issue of illegal wars. The wet Milliband election was the final straw. A more socialist/traditional Labour way of being come about. 

    It's far harder for the right wing Conservatives to bring that about after 2010/2015 GE wins. 
    Clarity over quantity.  
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • jpfampsjpfamps Frets: 1417
    The best way to understand how to get your message to the people is to go and talk to the people, not to bury yourself in a central London office with a load of people who did PPE at Oxbridge. 


    Like Seamus Milne for example......
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • Phil_aka_PipPhil_aka_Pip Frets: 8994
    Jeez, which split party to vote for? The free market one who don't agree internally or the socialist one who don't agree internally...
    ... and there doesn't appear to be a credible none-of-the-above alternative
    "Working" software has only unobserved bugs. (Parroty Error: Pieces of Nine! Pieces of Nine!)
    Seriously: If you value it, take/fetch it yourself
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Sign In or Register to comment.