Back door man

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quarkyquarky Frets: 2286
I live in a 2000 built house, and my wooden back door is looking pretty crappy. Is it easy enough to measure it, and buy a new one (from B&Q for example), or do I need to faff around with replacing the frame too? The frame looks OK at the moment to be honest..
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  • stevebrumstevebrum Frets: 4187
    edited June 12
    If you are replacing with another wooden door of the same size you can just use the existing frame.

    Do you have decent locks on your existing door that you can transplant into the new door?

    Putting in those (or new ones) might be the hardest bit for a DIYer.
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  • ronnybronnyb Frets: 531
    UPVC. Relatively easy to fit, better insulation and more secure than a wooden one. 
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  • boogiemanboogieman Frets: 5128
    ronnyb said:
    UPVC. Relatively easy to fit, better insulation and more secure than a wooden one. 
    This. If it’s a standard size you can get them off the shelf from Wickes. 
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  • ZoolooterZoolooter Frets: 298
    I'm sure there's more than a few 'back door' men on here who are willing and very adept with a tin of creosote.
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  • quarkyquarky Frets: 2286
    Thanks guys. I actually have an internal door where the mechanism broke (turn the handle and it doesn't open). I would feel relatively confident of doing that, but the external door worries me a bit more. Might go for the UPVC one as suggested and get it installed by a specialist :)
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  • ronnybronnyb Frets: 531
    quarky said:
    Thanks guys. I actually have an internal door where the mechanism broke (turn the handle and it doesn't open). I would feel relatively confident of doing that, but the external door worries me a bit more. Might go for the UPVC one as suggested and get it installed by a specialist :)
    Honestly it's not at all difficult. I never thought i could do things like that but i've fitted a fair few and never had a problem. As long as you measure the opening accurately and deduct about 5mm for the new frame to fit, the hardest thing will probably be getting the old wooden frame out. If you've got a hammer drill and a long masonry drill use 5 fixings (they're like long rawl plugs on either upright of the frame) into the brickwork and use expanding foam if there are any gaps. Don't forget to allow for the depth of a cill if there is one. Some of these window and door companies don't even use fixings, they just foam them in. When you look at some of the people the so called 'professionals' employ you'd probably do a better job yourself. (Apologies to any upvc fitters on here)  
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  • stevebrumstevebrum Frets: 4187
    edited June 12
    ronnyb said:
    UPVC. Relatively easy to fit, better insulation and more secure than a wooden one. 
    If security is a priority then a good wooden door with a quality mortise lock beats UPVC, as does composite.

    Composite seems to the best choice between security and ongoing maintenance. They are coming down in price as well.

    The other disadvantage to UPVC is you lose door width.
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  • 57Deluxe57Deluxe Frets: 5792
    stevebrum said:

    The other disadvantage to UPVC is you lose door width.
    yeah - why do they do that...??

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/bvg9U_qG7Ko/hqdefault.jpg


    <Vintage BOSS Upgrades>
    __________________________________
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  • Phil_aka_PipPhil_aka_Pip Frets: 9002
    Beware of those stupid thresholds the UPVC doors have. How you're supposed to get a flightcased AC30 in or out of one of those beats me. An extra 2" lip at the bottom? I don't think so! Demand a flat threshold.
    "Working" software has only unobserved bugs. (Parroty Error: Pieces of Nine! Pieces of Nine!)
    Seriously: If you value it, take/fetch it yourself
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  • fandangofandango Frets: 1109
    57Deluxe said:
    stevebrum said:

    The other disadvantage to UPVC is you lose door width.
    yeah - why do they do that...??

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/bvg9U_qG7Ko/hqdefault.jpg


    it stops them running away when you rip the shorts off  :o
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  • FretwiredFretwired Frets: 16979
    ronnyb said:
    UPVC. Relatively easy to fit, better insulation and more secure than a wooden one. 
    This ... although you should change the frame at the same time.
    My pump-action drivel gun is smoking hot today!
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  • quarkyquarky Frets: 2286
    Oh jesus. Screw that, then another wooden door it is :)
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  • Phil_aka_PipPhil_aka_Pip Frets: 9002
    57Deluxe said:
    stevebrum said:

    The other disadvantage to UPVC is you lose door width.
    yeah - why do they do that...??

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/bvg9U_qG7Ko/hqdefault.jpg


    Looks like the only gay in the village is stuck in the door
    "Working" software has only unobserved bugs. (Parroty Error: Pieces of Nine! Pieces of Nine!)
    Seriously: If you value it, take/fetch it yourself
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  • valevale Frets: 1036
    edited June 13
    ronnyb said:
    UPVC. Relatively easy to fit, better insulation and more secure than a wooden one. 
    the UPVC ones are horrible. we had a nice wooden one & the council did a 'replace everyone's door, even though it's not broken' thing as part of an eco drive.

    the UPVC one wasn't as draughty in winter, which some might consider a plus, but a bit of through draught is not a bad thing if you have a coal fire. & it kept the house fresh (kids & cat smells). so we were not bothered about draughts.

    but on the downside, the UPVC one smelled of polystyrene for months, was far too light & swingy (so caught the wind & kept slamming, locking my mum out) & used to scare the cat in summer because it creaked & cracked all day under the sun's heat.

    wood is good.
    hofner hussie & hayman harpie. what she said...
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  • ronnybronnyb Frets: 531
    Wood is good but plastic is fantastic.
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  • strtdvstrtdv Frets: 1213
    Composite is the way to go. Cost varies hugely by the type of door you go for. Our old front door was wood and we replaced it, along with the surround and an 18 inch pane of glass either side with a 70mm composite door with a large glass area in triple glazing, woodgrain foil inside and out and stained glass, along with matching stained glass triple glazing down each side. We also got a brass letterbox and knocker

    It was about £2400 but was a vast improvement on the old door and has a 15 year warranty and is virtually maintenance free.

    A 40mm composite back door with plain double glazing but foiled inside and out will set you back about £950 plus fitting
    Robot Lords of Tokyo, SMILE TASTE KITTENS!
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  • hywelghywelg Frets: 1532
    edited June 13
    uPVC just says "I didn't have enough money to do a proper job".

    If you have a prewar house you will devalue your house if you fit a uPVC  front door. Composite door styles are rarely suitable unless you've modernised the hell out  of the whole house and you have no style

    If you live in an Edwardian or Victorian house do not fit stained glass into double glazed panels in the front door. Technically a bad idea but also the aesthetics will be hugely compromised. 
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