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  • BridgehouseBridgehouse Frets: 13601
    Yes it’s an affinity j bass. I preferred it to the vintage modified to be honest. Prefer the feel of the neck. Wasn’t as heavy too.

    i ended up buying a used GK 1x8 combo of @dindude  which is awesome. Got everything well under budget! Happy days 
    I believe the bodies are a bit thinner on the affinity’s and the wood is usually a lighter type (basswood?) 

    Neck feel is an important factor to be honest. You can always upgrade the Pickups later anyway.
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  • FunkfingersFunkfingers Frets: 2959
    affinity j bass ... used GK 1x8 combo ... well under budget! Happy days 
    Glad to hear it.

    If you have any of your budget left, I suggest that you squander some of it on a set of strings. The set from the factory will leave much to be desired - even when brand new. 
    I fear the Geeks, even when they bear GIFs.
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  • BridgehouseBridgehouse Frets: 13601
    affinity j bass ... used GK 1x8 combo ... well under budget! Happy days 
    Glad to hear it.

    If you have any of your budget left, I suggest that you squander some of it on a set of strings. The set from the factory will leave much to be desired - even when brand new. 
    And even fender’s flatwounds are a significant improvement ;)
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  • dean111musicdean111music Frets: 101
    affinity j bass ... used GK 1x8 combo ... well under budget! Happy days 
    Glad to hear it.

    If you have any of your budget left, I suggest that you squander some of it on a set of strings. The set from the factory will leave much to be desired - even when brand new. 
    What strings do you recommend?

    how would I know if the previous owner had replaced the strings? They may of put new strings on?
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  • FunkfingersFunkfingers Frets: 2959
    how would I know if the previous owner had replaced the strings?
    Inspect the strings where they come into contact with the frets. You may see discolouration or slightly flattened areas. These are both indicative of strings that will soon require replacing.

    You paid one hundred and twenty Pounds for the Squier bass. Anderton's would have paid (or allowed) the previous owner considerably less than that for it. Even at trade price, the cost of new strings would have exceeded Anderton's profit margin. The shop will do nothing to harm that pre-owned bass guitar's chief selling point - its low price. Unless the shop's sales spiel claimed new strings in the description, assume that they did not change them.

    If the Squier bass is in extremely good cosmetic condition, this suggest very little use. This is characteristic of an unwanted birthday/Crimbo gift. Many owners would balk at the notion of paying over twenty quid for a set of strings that are getting little or no use. Once again, it is reasonable to assume that the strings have not been changed.


    I fear the Geeks, even when they bear GIFs.
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  • crunchmancrunchman Frets: 3502
    P or J bass? Which is more versatile? 
    Each can produce sounds that the other can not. 

    In my opinion, the mongrel PJ pickup configuration does not provide the best compromise of both ...




    ... unless it is the old Seymour Duncan Active EQ series "switch" pickups. This is because these pickups are cheating. The shapes of the housings have no influence on how the innards sound. Inside, the P and short J versions are identical.



    Positioning of the P pickup is important to get the P sound.  If you put it in the position that the Jazz neck pickup is normally in, it's too far towards the neck and it doesn't get the P sound at all.

    If you put the P pickup in the right place, then you won't get the full Jazz thing.  It's not just the different design of pickups, it's the distance between the pickups being significantly smaller.

    For me, if you are going PJ configuration, you have to put the P pickup in the correct place.  If you turn the volume of the bridge pickup down, then you at least have the proper P sound.  You then have some variation by adding in the bridge pickup if you want it.

    When I've been recording, I've found a Precision sits in the mix much better than a Jazz.  Getting the P sound right is the most important bit.

    To be honest, with a 34" scale, I just want a P bass with a Jazz neck.

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  • FunkfingersFunkfingers Frets: 2959
    crunchman said:
    Positioning of the P pickup is important to get the P sound. 
    Agreed.

    I have a modified J Bass copy. I carefully measured and marked up the P pickup cavity in the correct place. Then, I bought a blank J pickguard and made the pickup cut out myself. It looks ungainly but it gets THE sound.

    The nearest commercial thing to what I did is the Fender Reggie Hamilton Jazz Bass model. The D/G coil is pretty close to the edge.

    crunchman said:
    if you are going PJ configuration, you have to put the P pickup in the correct place.  If you turn the volume of the bridge pickup down, then you at least have the proper P sound.  You then have some variation by adding in the bridge pickup if you want it.
    This is precisely how I use the red Squier VM P Bass with EMG-GZR pickups that used to be my thumbnail pic. 

    In all of the video demonstrations that I have viewed, even on instruments with both EMG-GZR pickups fitted, Mr. Butler only seems to use the P. 

    The J type pickup dials in the sort of high frequency detail that might otherwise be summoned up using active EQ.

    Sometimes, I think that a better two pickup combination might be one Precision and one MM Stingray type, governed by an either/or selector switch. The other parings that work for me are the Billy Sheehan P + Mudbucker concept and Rickenbacker single coils. 
    I fear the Geeks, even when they bear GIFs.
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  • crunchmancrunchman Frets: 3502
    crunchman said:
    Positioning of the P pickup is important to get the P sound. 
    Agreed.

    I have a modified J Bass copy. I carefully measured and marked up the P pickup cavity in the correct place. Then, I bought a blank J pickguard and made the pickup cut out myself. It looks ungainly but it gets THE sound.

    The nearest commercial thing to what I did is the Fender Reggie Hamilton Jazz Bass model. The D/G coil is pretty close to the edge.

    crunchman said:
    if you are going PJ configuration, you have to put the P pickup in the correct place.  If you turn the volume of the bridge pickup down, then you at least have the proper P sound.  You then have some variation by adding in the bridge pickup if you want it.
    This is precisely how I use the red Squier VM P Bass with EMG-GZR pickups that used to be my thumbnail pic. 

    In all of the video demonstrations that I have viewed, even on instruments with both EMG-GZR pickups fitted, Mr. Butler only seems to use the P. 

    The J type pickup dials in the sort of high frequency detail that might otherwise be summoned up using active EQ.

    Sometimes, I think that a better two pickup combination might be one Precision and one MM Stingray type, governed by an either/or selector switch. The other parings that work for me are the Billy Sheehan P + Mudbucker concept and Rickenbacker single coils. 
    WD do a Reggie Hamilton plate.  That's what I did with my Jazz.  I do find myself using it purely on the P pickup a lot of the time.
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