Article on recording guitar playing vocalists

I saw this and thought it might be worth a share. Any thoughts form those with experience of this sort of thing?

https://www.soundonsound.com/techniques/recording-singing-guitarist
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  • FunkfingersFunkfingers Frets: 3369
    edited July 1
    The perennial dilemma is best performance versus most controllable recorded sound at the mixing stage.

    Why not begin with an all-at-once performance? Think of it as a guide.

    Next, tell the performer that, in the interests of a strong finished sound, it will be necessary to double track the vocal as an overdub (sans guitar). With that done, ask for the guitar part to be double-tracked.

    My bias is towards a slightly rough sounding, compelling performance rather than a beautiful recording of a gutless performance.




    I note that the SOS article predates the L.R. Baggs Anthem and Lyric Tru-Mic transducer systems. In my opinion, these sound better than any of the products mentioned in the sidebar column. Unfortunately, being microphone-based, these systems will detect unwanted sounds from the surrounding air and physical impacts against the guitar body. 
    "It's no wonder the Pacific Ocean is blue."
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  • camfcamf Frets: 740
    Interesting. Do you prefer these systems over mics in general or just the mics mentioned? 
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  • FunkfingersFunkfingers Frets: 3369
    Having a PZM inside the guitar eliminates the problem of movement on and off axis relative to a conventional microphone on a stand. The vocals will still spill during quiet passages.

    In a multi-track recording situation, I would take the L. R. Baggs system signal in addition to all the other microphones.


    On a general level, I agree with the SOS contributor about the artificial tone derived from under saddle transducers.

    Last month, I worked on a budget electro-acoustic guitar with a laminate soundboard and a moulded plastic back. That really did sound *plasticky*. Having said this, in some circumstances, that sound could be exactly what some music requires.
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  • BazzBassBazzBass Frets: 1
    edited July 31
    I am recording my band's debut release at the moment,we are trying for a live recording as much as possible. I'm using a Focusrite 18i20 into Reaper. Electric drums, bass, electric guitar and an acoustic.
    My condenser vocal mic picks up the acoustic guitar as well as the drum pads.
    I can't really isolate the vox mic so we are going to have to overdub all vocals.
    But the playing is all live,we will probably overdub the acoustic with the vox mic to augment it's DI'd live take.

    If you actually want to record an acoustic guitar and vox live, I would use a large diaphram condenser mic placed at the singers throat height, pointing downwards towards the neck/body join,maybe one to two feet away.

    Thanks for sharing, there is no right way, but lots of different ways to record, that's why I love forums like this one and Sound on Sound, the ONLY magazine I buy anymore
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