Tips for buying a new house?

What's Hot
Spotted a house that we would like to buy, have to sell ours then borrow a bit more. Have been approved for a new deal and a good rate from the bank.

Just wondered if any for forumites have any general tips to pass on, that will make the process smoothier, from selling ours, negotiating to buy the new one or any pitfalls that I might need to be aware of?
0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
«1

Comments

  • markblagdonmarkblagdon Frets: 694
    Is it a new as in “new build” on a new building site or just new to you?
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • NiallseroreillyNiallseroreilly Frets: 362
    Is it a new as in “new build” on a new building site or just new to you?
    Apologies, title is misleading... just a new house to me.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • monofinmonofin Frets: 1074
    Sounds like you haven't sold yours yet so don't set your heart on anything until you've got a sale.


    Oh... And if an estate agent tells you the sky is blue go outside and check for yourself

    2reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 9reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • ThePrettyDamnedThePrettyDamned Frets: 3821
    Find a good estate agent. There are some bad ones out there, but there are some honest, hardworking ones who genuinely want to help too. 
    1reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • thermionicthermionic Frets: 4761
    Househunting sucks. I sold my house for £5k below the asking price, which realistically, I was quite happy with. Saw a nice house despite the estate agent’s determination to prevent me me from viewing it. I offered the asking price, but was told they’d accepted an offer from somebody else and wouldn’t allow me to up my offer. Then my buyer pulled out, despite having been in my house twice with a builder, poking around nonchallantly. Then I reluctantly accepted a much lower offer. Saw another nice house and offered £15k more than the best offer, but was rejected. I upped it by another £10k and didn’t hear anything back for days. After a bit of pestering I was told somebody had offered the asking price. So I offered £5k over the asking price and was told they’d accepted more from somebody else. Meanwhile, my estate agent is phoning me up twice a week asking when I’m moving out.
    0reaction image LOL 3reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • skunkwerxskunkwerx Frets: 1323
    Make sure its made of bricks otherwise I shall huff and I shall puff and it might fall down. 
    The only easy day, was yesterday...
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • thumpingrugthumpingrug Frets: 1196
    No advice, just wish you well.    We bought and sold a couple fo years ago.  The estate agent we sold with was a local one with a good reputation.  They worked well, arranged lots of viewings and our place sold quickly.  The agents for the house we bought were a big national chain and count give a toss.  We were lucky that we could deal directly with the vendor and arrange visits to ask questions.  They invited us to dinner one evening and we met the neighbours over a nice meal a few weeks be our moving.  Our issue was solicitors and the conveyancing which took far longer than it should have and at one point put the sales risk until both I and the vendor contacted our solicitors on the same day (coordinated attack) and threatened them with a complaint unless they got things moving.  Each was blaming the other party and we knew because we were talking regularly that they had the information they were claiming to be waiting for.   After our purchase went through I did make a complaint to the solicitors and receives a bit fo a refund and an apology from the head of the practice, but suspect that this was only because they had been found out.

    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • Phil_aka_PipPhil_aka_Pip Frets: 8871
    Is it a new as in “new build” on a new building site or just new to you?
    Apologies, title is misleading... just a new house to me.
    I was going to say "Don't. Get an old one"
    "Working" software has only unobserved bugs. (Parroty Error: Pieces of Nine! Pieces of Nine!)
    Seriously: If you value it, take/fetch it yourself
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • ModellistaModellista Frets: 794
    edited July 7
    ^ similar to above. The stress of house buying is in my experience largely due the laziness and incompetence of certain members of the legal profession. Choose your conveyancer with care. Preferably a small practice that just deals with conveyancing. Both times I've had to deal with practices that offer conveyancing as one part of a wide portfolio seem to think it's beneath them and put it to the bottom of the pile until the last minute. 

    Try and be on in good terms with your buyer and vendor and communicate with them independently of the conveyancers. Otherwise it's a horrible game of Chinese whispers with the lawyers trying to cover their backs and talking nonsense. Being able to converse with the other parties is the only way of getting things properly moving. Similar story to thumpingrug above. 
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 2reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • darthed1981darthed1981 Frets: 2016
    any pitfalls that I might need to be aware of?
    Mostly the money-grabbing tosspieces who fleece you at every stage of the process, and the pathological stress levels of trying to complete in a sea of professional indifference...

    So, have fun! ;)
    Warning: this post may contain overtly affectionate references to Mary Spender
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • spark240spark240 Frets: 913
    Its been a while....but I did sell me flat for less than I wanted and paid over asking for a house....that said it was a good  move so no regrets at all...sometimes you have to do whats best for you...not just the bank balance.

    And yes....most agents Ive dealt with have been pretty useless....so start on that basis and it can only get better ;-) 


    Mac Mini i7, 2.3Ghz.
    Presonus Studio One Pro.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • monofinmonofin Frets: 1074
    I'm in the middle of a double move. Sold and moved out of our house in April. Now renting while we wait for new house to be built - hopefully moving in September.
    Seem to have been constantly paying g people large amounts of money for very little return all year

    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • PVO_DavePVO_Dave Frets: 1398
    Just try and stay calm through it, don’t get your hopes up on a place you can’t offer on yet (until you have a buyer for yours) and keep your fingers crossed for decent buyers!

    We moved the end of April after a tonne of stress, our house went on sale Jan 4th, sold the same weekend, that then fell through (due to our buyers buyer dropping out), we sold again for more than we were expecting to get the same day the original sale fell through, they then lost their buyer. In the end us and the second buyer agreed to both drop our prices so they could take less on their place for a quick sale. I’d managed to get the people we were buying from to hold on for us, they’d been let down a few times already so were keen to find a good buyer.

    All worked out in the end, but the final exchange and completion date was delayed by about 3 weeks due to a complete numpty of a solicitor a few people down the chain.

    Tonnes of stress, but couldn’t be happier in the new place :) - Good Luck!!
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • ChalkyChalky Frets: 5436
    Three things to remember:
    1 For most folks, house-buying is the largest financial transaction of their life, so you need to be at your most mature and decisive.
    2 You are not in control and cannot speed up the process, it will happen when it happens.  You will meet people who will tell you they "pushed theirs through". They delude themselves into thinking that to feel better about how long it took.
    3 It is like a visit to the dentists. You want it but it is going to hurt in more ways than you expect.  Like a long haul flight you just have to put up with it. The end will justify your endurance.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 7reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • Phil_aka_PipPhil_aka_Pip Frets: 8871
    wis @Chalky

    Hold out for what you want.

    "Working" software has only unobserved bugs. (Parroty Error: Pieces of Nine! Pieces of Nine!)
    Seriously: If you value it, take/fetch it yourself
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • HattigolHattigol Frets: 960
    My advice, for what it's worth:

    The two most important things are 1. Location and 2. Plot size. 

    Anything else, you can change but not those. So make sure you find somewhere that ticks those boxes.
    "Anybody can play. The note is only 20%. The attitude of the motherf*cker who plays it is  80%" - Miles Davis
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • NiallseroreillyNiallseroreilly Frets: 362
    edited July 7
    Thanks for all the sage advice....i guess it is as i expected....a couple of months of melt...
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • midlifecrisismidlifecrisis Frets: 1228
    dont be afraid to haggle the estate agents down bigtime with their commision. We were offered 1.5% but we offered  a flat £2000 fee inc vat.  we sold for 550k so it worked out less than 0.5% on total sale. they still got £2k not bad for not much work.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 1reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • DefaultMDefaultM Frets: 1912
    One of the worst days I've had was the day before we were due to move.
    I left work and my car Engine light came on. Managed to get it round to the garage, took out my phone to call my wife and saw I had a voice mail. It was from the solicitor, very casually telling me that the sale had all fallen through because someone down the chain hadn't disclosed that they didn't actually own 100% of their house. Still remember his stupid fucking chuckle as he said I wouldn't be moving.
    Got inside the garage and the computer in my car had failed and it was a grand plus labour.
    0reaction image LOL 4reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • SporkySporky Frets: 13540
    Remember that you're not buying the current owner's ugly furniture and selfie ego-wall.

    And check all the taps, windows, and doors work. 
    Be your own evil twin. 
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • fandangofandango Frets: 1067
    When buying, look the prospective house and area over in both daytime and evening. There could be a big difference in ambience, depending on what the neighbours are like when they get home. Remember neighbourhood is an important part of buying. Don't neglect researching the surrounding roads, dog walking parks, pubs, reputation of the local hookers schools etc

    Selling - what's the state of your house like? Could a lick of paint, or some time in the garden pay off to make your house more attractive? Even considering temporarily storing some of your less salubrious furniture might help, depending on condition and colour of said furniture, so as to make the place a little less cluttered and dishevelled. Not that any fretboarder should stoop to live in a dishevelled hovel anyway.

    Good luck.

    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • rlwrlw Frets: 1622
    edited July 8
    We are in the second day of cleaning the house in detail, tidying up and getting ready for photographs next week.   This morning I spent hours up the ladder cleaning the window frames and the glass, just to make it look as good as it can.  Still to do, touching up all the chipped paint,  de-weeding the front - paved - garden, polishing the shower room tiling and making good all the mildewed, mouldy bits - and so on.  Hours to go yet.  Open day next weekend so it's got to look great to start a bidding war.

    All the amps and extraneous stuff are in the loft, as is anything that doesn't have an immediate good impact.
    Save a cow.  Eat a vegetarian.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • boogiemanboogieman Frets: 5036
    fandango said:
    When buying, look the prospective house and area over in both daytime and evening. There could be a big difference in ambience, depending on what the neighbours are like when they get home. Remember neighbourhood is an important part of buying. Don't neglect researching the surrounding roads, dog walking parks, pubs, reputation of the local hookers schools etc



    I was going to say the same thing, definitely see the property at different times of day. You might find you have noisy neighbours who are out working during the day or there’s other issues. I learnt this from hard experience: we were on the point of putting in an offer on one place until we found out the road outside got completely rammed twice a day with all the parents dropping their kids off at the school down the road.

    You could also check if there’s a local Facebook group and see what people are complaining about or commenting on : you might find there’s a particular problem in the area that’s not immediately obvious. 
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • Phil_aka_PipPhil_aka_Pip Frets: 8871
    Sporky said:
    Remember that you're not buying the current owner's ugly furniture and selfie ego-wall.

    And check all the taps, windows, and doors work. 
    In one I looked at recently the seller offered me tea/coffee? I asked for water. It was drinkable :) Then just before leaving I asked to use the Little Boys' Room. The loo flushed and I washed my hands. Wasn't a rigorous check but it told me that at least the basics were in working order.

    You're right about not buying someone else's junk. Look at the ceilings not at the available floor space. The ceilings will give you a far better idea of the room size.
    "Working" software has only unobserved bugs. (Parroty Error: Pieces of Nine! Pieces of Nine!)
    Seriously: If you value it, take/fetch it yourself
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • fandangofandango Frets: 1067
    rlw said:
    We are in the second day of cleaning the house in detail, tidying up and getting ready for photographs next week.   This morning I spent hours up the ladder cleaning the window frames and the glass, just to make it look as good as it can.  Still to do, touching up all the chipped paint,  de-weeding the front - paved - garden, polishing the shower room tiling and making good all the mildewed, mouldy bits - and so on.  Hours to go yet.  Open day next weekend so it's got to look great to start a bidding war.

    All the amps and extraneous stuff are in the loft, as is anything that doesn't have an immediate good impact.
    The loft? In this heat? Hooooo, that's brave.

    Can you not afford temporary storage or shift the amps off to trusted relatives or friends?
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • FreebirdFreebird Frets: 850
    edited July 8
    Find a good estate agent. There are some bad ones out there, but there are some honest, hardworking ones who genuinely want to help too. 
    There are good and bad ones working in the same office!
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • 57Deluxe57Deluxe Frets: 5706
    don't tell your neighbours ANYTHING about your past and present. Keep'm at arms length and then you can play you guitar loud and not give a fcuck. Then move.
    <Vintage BOSS Upgrades>
    __________________________________
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • JAYJOJAYJO Frets: 808
     View property more than once. If it says includes Central Heating check thats upstairs And Downstairs. Check the Boiler, Check any double Glazing etc check the electrics,check the water pressure on the shower  All these things i failed to do and spent a fortune just to get the house comfortable. If i had looked properly i would have dropped my offer.
    Make sure the seller takes all their stuff with them so you can actually move yours in. I should have bought some tissues also as the Mrs wouldnt stop crying the new house was so filthy when we moved in. I blame myself for not looking properly. 
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • rlwrlw Frets: 1622
    fandango said:
    rlw said:
    We are in the second day of cleaning the house in detail, tidying up and getting ready for photographs next week.   This morning I spent hours up the ladder cleaning the window frames and the glass, just to make it look as good as it can.  Still to do, touching up all the chipped paint,  de-weeding the front - paved - garden, polishing the shower room tiling and making good all the mildewed, mouldy bits - and so on.  Hours to go yet.  Open day next weekend so it's got to look great to start a bidding war.

    All the amps and extraneous stuff are in the loft, as is anything that doesn't have an immediate good impact.
    The loft? In this heat? Hooooo, that's brave.

    Can you not afford temporary storage or shift the amps off to trusted relatives or friends?
    Only cheapies but they take up a lot of space.  Tomorrow, I'm going to put all the guitars in my car in the garage, just to get them out of the way.
    Save a cow.  Eat a vegetarian.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
  • rlwrlw Frets: 1622
    We're looking for a new home and are attracted to some of the new ones being built - in York  - but the builders are demanding six weeks between exchange and completion and not allowing you to reserve unless you can comply.   That's going to be tough for most people.

    As to what to do, draw up a list of your requirements and prioritize each item so that you establish what can and cannot be compromised.  Ours is

    • absolute limit of £550k including, potentially, buying at far less and doing up
    • Within walking distance - 1.5 miles of the city centre or station
    • 3/4 bedrooms
    • 2 loos
    • private parking - drive or garage
    • garden - could be a courtyard
    Beyond that, anything goes but anything too shabby or neglected is likely to get overlooked in favour of better maintained places.   Also, no loo in the cupboard under the stairs, no leaded lights, nothing too close to its neighbour and nothing shaded by trees which we won't own.



    Save a cow.  Eat a vegetarian.
    0reaction image LOL 0reaction image Wow! 0reaction image Wisdom · Share on Facebook Share on Twitter
Sign In or Register to comment.