Guitar Tutors - method book recommendations

BahHumbugBahHumbug Frets: 125
Hi, I've been teaching guitar for about a year and a half.  I do quite a bit of preparing my own materials, which is of course quite labour intensive.  I haven't really engaged with method books yet, and the odd one or two that I've looked at (Hal Leonard publications for example) haven't inspired me at all.
Can any of you other tutors make any recommendations on method books?  I suppose I'm thinking particularly for youngsters, although the youngest I've taught so far has been 10 yrs old.

Thanks in anticipation.
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Comments

  • As a teenager I hard acoustic guitar lessons using the Alfred Guitar Method. I was taught by a pro player at the then Birmingham Guitar School.Might be worth checking out.It's in it's 3rd edition I believe,and still going strong.I'm not a tutor but thought it worth a mention.
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  • I'm not a fan of "one-size-fits all" approaches as everyone is different. Of course if its a group to save time its quicker to use one resource. Its not really a method but I do use the RGT Grade handbooks with some learners. Its well structured and shows exactly what you need to reach that certain grade.
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  • duotoneduotone Frets: 288
    Former student here...well around 20 years ago.  I found that the Hal Leonard books to be really useful at the time.  Back then it didn’t come with a tape/cd but I found that it was clear and easy to follow.  They were Guitar Method 1 & 2, think I’ve got them kicking around at home somewhere, although I never use them now.


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  • For absolute beginners, especially the younger ones we use the Hal Leonard Book One and walk them through the whole book so they get up to speed on basic theory.  I say "we" meaning the school I teach at.  Any beginner book will do though, they all teach the same thing, we use it because the store the school is part of carries Hal Leonard books.  Once we're through that book we can work towards what they want to do.  This saves us all a lot of prep time, but we do get more into that with more advanced students.

    Whoever called it "rush hour" should not be allowed to name anything else.

    Dulcet Jones Creepy Music Blog http://dulcetjones.blogspot.com/

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  • BarneyBarney Frets: 353
    I have found method books don't always work because everybody wants different things out of playing guitar ..I tend to find out what type of music they like and work towards that

    sometimes in a lesson we will work on a tune one half then scale type stuff or new chords the second half ..sometimes iff they have a particular thing they are struggling with we will work on that and how to overcome it the whole lesson 

    Some people just want to learn a few songs to play and sing round a barbecue...others want to be the next Steve Vai.. sometimes the ones that just want to play round the barbecue will want more from it in time ....so many variables in my opinion 




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  • VibetronicVibetronic Frets: 288
    I don't use method books myself yet*. I do pretty much the same as @Barney - gear each set of lessons towards what they want to get out of it. Similarly, it tends to be a mix of theory/technique, then applying that to examples from the type of music they like (ie learning tunes/riffs). I've got about 20 students now and they are pretty much split into 3 types, and this seems to work - young kids with not much attention span/more advanced players aged 20-30ish who want to improve technique/older people who used to play or have just taken it up as they have more free time. 

    *Having said that I don't, I'm just about to invest in a few (probably the Rockschool syllabus books and a couple of HL ones). None of my students have any inclination to study for exams, but I need to be prepared in case I get any that do - plus it'd be good to have some structured learning guides to fall back on. 
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  • Barney said:
    I have found method books don't always work because everybody wants different things out of playing guitar ..I tend to find out what type of music they like and work towards that

    sometimes in a lesson we will work on a tune one half then scale type stuff or new chords the second half ..sometimes iff they have a particular thing they are struggling with we will work on that and how to overcome it the whole lesson 

    Some people just want to learn a few songs to play and sing round a barbecue...others want to be the next Steve Vai.. sometimes the ones that just want to play round the barbecue will want more from it in time ....so many variables in my opinion 




    This.

    As a tutor of 10 years so many people ask "Do I need to buy a book?" before starting lessons. Unless you're doing grades then the answer is always no. I am the book in some ways, I put together material that is suited to their playing level, style and musical tastes. If I don't think they can play it I won't give them it. And I don't like the idea of a book showing them how to do something, especially when the resource is inaccurate anyway.
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