Guitarcenter website, no access

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skikdi53skikdi53 Frets: 88
edited December 4 in Guitar
From France  it is not possible to access the guitarcenter website in USA  
Is it the same in UK?
I copy the message I have:

Dear Customer,

Based on your location, we are unable to take you to the Guitar Center website at this time. For more information regarding the new GDPR regulations, go to https://edps.europa.eu/data-protection/data-protection/legislation/history-general-data-protection-regulation_en.

We apologize for any inconvenience and look forward to serving you again soon.

Thank you,

Guitar Center

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  • gringopiggringopig Frets: 799
    Yes, same for me in Scotland. I used to get this on the Musician's Friend website but just checked and they must have changed their website to agree with EU regulations recently.
    https://www.musiciansfriend.com/
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  • tekbowtekbow Frets: 123
    No, they're geolocked since that EU internet privacy thingy earlier in the year.

    If you use a VPN and connect to a server in the states, you'll be able to view, but they probably won't ship.
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  • danishbacondanishbacon Frets: 346
    Gdpr
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  • tekbowtekbow Frets: 123
    @danishbacon , yeah, that's the thing.
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  • BrizeBrize Frets: 2779
    Typical EU bollocks. As always, the inconvenience caused by their petty regulations is disproportionate to any advantage afforded to citizens. You can't view a website now without having to close two nag notices relating to cookies and GDPR.
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  • tekbowtekbow Frets: 123
    Yawn.
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  • skikdi53skikdi53 Frets: 88
    Many other us website are ok.
    not all use that ip select.
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  • BigsbyBigsby Frets: 933
    Brize said:
    Typical EU bollocks. As always, the inconvenience caused by their petty regulations is disproportionate to any advantage afforded to citizens. 
    This is only true if you have no idea how valuable your data and privacy actually are. The EU have been more effective than most governments in taking powerful corporations to task for abusing their power - and to be able to do so they need laws in place. Few governments today have the clout to deal with those corporations on their own, thankfully, the EU do. 
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  • BrizeBrize Frets: 2779
    edited December 4
    Bigsby said:
    Brize said:
    Typical EU bollocks. As always, the inconvenience caused by their petty regulations is disproportionate to any advantage afforded to citizens. 
    This is only true if you have no idea how valuable your data and privacy actually are. The EU have been more effective than most governments in taking powerful corporations to task for abusing their power - and to be able to do so they need laws in place. Few governments today have the clout to deal with those corporations on their own, thankfully, the EU do. 
    The EU does nothing to hold powerful corporations to account for abusing their power. What they do is create byzantine rules that have to be implemented by member states, leading to confusion because the rules are so vague that they are open to interpretation. Millions of pounds are then spent on implementation and the bad guys still find loopholes to do whatever they need to do while the good guys and consumers are left hamstrung and inconvenienced.

    Regulation has become an industry unto itself, and nowhere is this more evident than within the EU. Those guys need to keep pumping out new products, and member states have no choice but to buy them.
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  • BigsbyBigsby Frets: 933
    edited December 5
    Brize said:
    Bigsby said:
    Brize said:
    Typical EU bollocks. As always, the inconvenience caused by their petty regulations is disproportionate to any advantage afforded to citizens. 
    This is only true if you have no idea how valuable your data and privacy actually are. The EU have been more effective than most governments in taking powerful corporations to task for abusing their power - and to be able to do so they need laws in place. Few governments today have the clout to deal with those corporations on their own, thankfully, the EU do. not being able to call a sausage a sausage, 
    The EU does nothing to hold powerful corporations to account for abusing their power. 
    The truth is they have done so, and continue to do so. You just won't read about it in the Daily Mail. Instead you'll hear fake news stories about not being able to call a sausage a sausage, or not being able to buy bunches of bananas because of those damned bureaucrats in Bruxelles, and blah blah blah, endless bullshit and bollocks to wind up their readers...

    Here's a quick quote, as an example: "Margrethe Vestager wants to keep European markets competitive -- which is why, on behalf of the EU, she's fined Google $2.8 billion for breaching antitrust rules, asked Apple for $15.3 billion in back taxes and investigated a range of companies, from Gazprom to Fiat, for anti-competitive practices".

    Here's the talk.
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  • BrizeBrize Frets: 2779
    ^^ A fine that will never be paid and back taxes that the Irish government didn't want to collect, to the point that the EU initiated legal action against the Irish state. The morality of those cases is not clear-cut.

    "Few in Silicon Valley doubt that competition policy in Europe is anything but thinly veiled protectionism aimed at shielding the region’s old-economy firms from disruption.":

    https://www.economist.com/business/2017/09/14/is-margrethe-vestager-championing-consumers-or-her-political-career
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  • Fifty9Fifty9 Frets: 132
    The Irish government doesn’t want to collect those taxes because it does deals with the likes of Apple to pay minimal tax for using Ireland as a base and Ireland gets to employ thousands of people and claim to be a tech hub
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  • Brize said:
    Typical EU bollocks. As always, the inconvenience caused by their petty regulations is disproportionate to any advantage afforded to citizens. You can't view a website now without having to close two nag notices relating to cookies and GDPR.
    More like some US firms, such as Guitar Center, petulantly saying 'If we can't collect any data we like on you, and do whatever we want with it, then fek you, we won't even let you look at our website'.
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  • stickyfiddlestickyfiddle Frets: 9752
    Given their commercial agreements mean they can't sell most of their big ticket products into Europe, I don't blame them for not wanting to get bogged down in GDPR
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  • Strat54Strat54 Frets: 993
    Never looked at their site for years, but back in the day when the pound was strong I spent around $20k with them. Despite their reputation they had a guy called Steve Pisani who was super efficient. He now owns D'Angelico Guitars.
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  • BrizeBrize Frets: 2779
    Brize said:
    Typical EU bollocks. As always, the inconvenience caused by their petty regulations is disproportionate to any advantage afforded to citizens. You can't view a website now without having to close two nag notices relating to cookies and GDPR.
    More like some US firms, such as Guitar Center, petulantly saying 'If we can't collect any data we like on you, and do whatever we want with it, then fek you, we won't even let you look at our website'.
    And what meaningful data do you think they'll be able to collect on you from you simply visiting their website?
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  • tekbowtekbow Frets: 123
    Brize said:
    Brize said:
    Typical EU bollocks. As always, the inconvenience caused by their petty regulations is disproportionate to any advantage afforded to citizens. You can't view a website now without having to close two nag notices relating to cookies and GDPR.
    More like some US firms, such as Guitar Center, petulantly saying 'If we can't collect any data we like on you, and do whatever we want with it, then fek you, we won't even let you look at our website'.
    And what meaningful data do you think they'll be able to collect on you from you simply visiting their website?

    https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/key-definitions/what-is-personal-data/

    2 min google search.

    Such information can often be sold on to marketing companies etc etc without our consent. The key issue is that personal information of any level of meaningfulness is still personal data and should not be harvested without our consent.

    Now please, please for goodness sake, grow the hell up and stop turning a thread on a simple question into something it doesn't need to be, i.e. a bloody argument irrelevant to the question the OP asked.

    Honestly, for a group of people that supposedly got what they wanted, you don't half whinge about it.

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  • BigsbyBigsby Frets: 933
    Brize said:
    Brize said:
    Typical EU bollocks. As always, the inconvenience caused by their petty regulations is disproportionate to any advantage afforded to citizens. You can't view a website now without having to close two nag notices relating to cookies and GDPR.
    More like some US firms, such as Guitar Center, petulantly saying 'If we can't collect any data we like on you, and do whatever we want with it, then fek you, we won't even let you look at our website'.
    And what meaningful data do you think they'll be able to collect on you from you simply visiting their website?
    They don't want you to merely visit their web site, they want you to interact with it. As soon as you do that, they start to get meaningful data. The implications of this are many and varied, and I doubt anyone has a clear picture of all of them, and where they might lead us in coming years: Few stopped to consider how Facebook data might be used to influence a US presidential election, for example.  Whether you're aware of these things or not, whether you care about them or not, others do, and that's why we're fortunate enough to have some legislation in place. Data & privacy protection are not simple things to implement, a broad brush is needed. You might want to look at how algorithms are using big data, and the implications this can have on all of us, as an example of why it matters.

    But by the sound of things, you're just interested in EU bashing, so there's little point in debating it with you - you've yet to offer a single fact, just insinuations such as 'they'll never pay' - which is not a fact.

    FWIW, I had to deal with GDPR as a small business that needs to process mental health data, and that can included data on gender, sexual history and criminal records - so the new regulations had many implications. The issues I had to deal with came from the UK, specifically the ICO, and their inability to provide usable information on implementing policies right up to the day the law came into effect. You think the EU are the issue, try taking a closer look at Westminster, and the clowns we've got in parliament, the unelected members of the lords and civil servants. After two years of negotiating, they've got a deal none of them actually want or believe in, by contrast, the whole block of remaining EU nations have managed to agree it without an argument. And still some people say the UK will be able to negotiate better trade deals outside the EU. What a joke.
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  • edited December 5
    Brize said:
    And what meaningful data do you think they'll be able to collect on you from you simply visiting their website?
    The simple fact that you have visited their website and they can identify and collect your unique IP address, what computer you are using and so on is valuable information. For example, any company in the business of selling guitars would like to know who out there has been looking at guitar-related sites.

    Because every website you use can do this, and most sites use multiple tracking services, and because this information is shared (i.e. bought and sold), a complete personal profile can be built up of your shopping habits, interests, even likely political outlook. Even if you never log in to an account to use sites like Google, they are still able to target ads by the use of such shared information, and of course if you are logged in they will collect your complete search history.  Sites such as Facebook, who have a personal record of much of your life, also continue to track you even when you are not logged in. This is easy, given that they know your IP from when you log in, and can reference that IP when you are logged out but use one of their 'tools' on another website, which will also be collecting information about your visit.

    That's just the beginning. Just look how the notorious Cambridge Analytica use such profile data for political ends.

    You, and many others, might be happy about largely anonymous corporations building a complete profile of your on-line activity, buying and selling that information as they think fit, with the individual having no control over that data ('Whatever', as the Daily Mash opt-out button puts it) but the EU quite rightly believes that such data collection should at least be consensual.




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  • BigsbyBigsby Frets: 933

    Brize said:
    ^^ A fine that will never be paid and back taxes that the Irish government didn't want to collect, to the point that the EU initiated legal action against the Irish state. The morality of those cases is not clear-cut.

    "Few in Silicon Valley doubt that competition policy in Europe is anything but thinly veiled protectionism aimed at shielding the region’s old-economy firms from disruption.":

    https://www.economist.com/business/2017/09/14/is-margrethe-vestager-championing-consumers-or-her-political-career
    Very selective quoting on your part. From the same article:

    Since she assumed her current role in November 2014, Ms Vestager has had several high-profile clashes with American tech firms. In May she fined Facebook €110m for misleading EU trustbusters about its takeover of WhatsApp, a messaging service. In June a long-running investigation resulted in a €2.4bn fine on Google for using its search engine to promote its own comparison-shopping service. EU trustbusters have also charged Google with using its Android operating system to promote its mobile-phone apps and services over those of rivals. That investigation continues.

    Brussels believes the growing power of big tech firms to shape politics, society and the economy requires a counterweight. The battle is of greater urgency, the commission reckons, because the data that tech monopolies have accumulated make it far harder for upstart firms to displace them or keep them in check.

    In some of the battles she has started, tech giants had a case to answer. Facebook’s misdeed, for instance, is not much disputed. The Google Android investigation seems to have merit.

    Her main aim may have been to get the issue of corporate-tax evasion firmly on the agenda. If so, it was a tactical masterstroke.
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  • BrizeBrize Frets: 2779
    Bigsby said:
    FWIW, I had to deal with GDPR as a small business that needs to process mental health data, and that can included data on gender, sexual history and criminal records - so the new regulations had many implications. The issues I had to deal with came from the UK, specifically the ICO, and their inability to provide usable information on implementing policies right up to the day the law came into effect.
    I also have extensive professional experience of dealing with GDPR. Yes, the ICO were useless, but EU directives, by their nature, are broad, vague and open to interpretation.
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  • BrizeBrize Frets: 2779
    tekbow said:

    Now please, please for goodness sake, grow the hell up and stop turning a thread on a simple question into something it doesn't need to be, i.e. a bloody argument irrelevant to the question the OP asked.

    Honestly, for a group of people that supposedly got what they wanted, you don't half whinge about it.

    Grow the hell up? Okay Dad.

    The thread was about GDPR, which is an EU directive. Thus, it's perfectly reasonable and proportionate to knock the EU for producing byzantine legislation that has unintended consequences. You may not agree, which is your prerogative, but I'm not trying to take the thread off topic.

    From my perspective it's the EU sycophants that love a whinge. As to 'getting what I wanted', Brexit has not happened and is unlikely to happen in a meaningful way. Personally, I'd prefer to remain than go with May's deal, although my preference would be to leave without a deal. I abhor the EU, which is bloated, authoritarian and undemocratic, and my views have nothing to do with straight bananas or immigration. Don't let that stop you from thinking that I'm a racist, knuckle-dragging Daily Mail reader, though.
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  • tekbowtekbow Frets: 123

     No, the thread was a guy asking why he couldn't access a US website.

    The reason was GDPR. All concerned went "Ah OK question answered."

    Cue whinging stage right. Not every conversation everywhere has to be a lengthy justification about why that vote scraped a majority. It's almost as if supporters are really insecure about it.

    I said nothing as to what i thought of your position on race, the length of your arms, or what newspaper you choose to read. please don't be so intellectually dishonest as to tell me what i think.

    I merely pointed out that this is so old by now. An innocuous question can't even be asked without a lengthy tirade about how everything is the EU's fault. this isn't even the Off Topic thread and we're decidedly off topic.


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  • BrizeBrize Frets: 2779
    edited December 5
    ^^

    @tekbow GDPR is an EU directive, so the suggestion that we can only note that it's due to GDPR but not go on to discuss the unintended consequences of the EU's byzantine regulation is completely disingenuous. If we accept that GDPR is imperfect and has caused issues, whose fault is it but the EU's?

    >The reason was GDPR. All concerned went "Ah OK question answered."

    The 'question' was answered in the original post - the OP knew that it was due to GDPR, which is clearly stated in his post. This is a discussion forum, so the idea that we can't then go on to discuss the issue is a nonsense. I know that some people are very sensitive to EU bashing, but it's a fair sport.

    If you read back through the thread you'll see that you were the first person to allude to the referendum.
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  • tekbowtekbow Frets: 123
    We nothing, maybe you can't, as you're the only one ranting and attempting to justify your rant.

    Really? You know being disingenuous isn't  any more intellectually honest than attempting to tell me what i think.

    What a shame. Ignore list for you I think.
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  • crunchmancrunchman Frets: 4064
    Bigsby said:

      You think the EU are the issue, try taking a closer look at Westminster, and the clowns we've got in parliament, the unelected members of the lords and civil servants. After two years of negotiating, they've got a deal none of them actually want or believe in, by contrast, the whole block of remaining EU nations have managed to agree it without an argument. And still some people say the UK will be able to negotiate better trade deals outside the EU. What a joke.

    No-one in the EU is arguing over it because it is a great deal for them.  We will be stuck in the free market and customs union, unable to leave, but we won't be able to vote against their directives any more.  If our government hadn't caved in at every turn, then you would have seen friction and division among the EU 27.


    There are things you can do to avoid letting things be tracked so much.  You can use a search engine like DuckDuckGo, you can get a VPN, or you can change your cookie settings - although that last one might affect how you can use some websites.

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  • So once again the EU gets blamed for something that's someone else's fault. In this case companies being lazy. 

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  • danishbacondanishbacon Frets: 346
    Brize said:
    @tekbow GDPR is an EU directive, so the suggestion that we can only note that it's due to GDPR but not go on to discuss the unintended consequences of the EU's byzantine regulation is completely disingenuous. If we accept that GDPR is imperfect and has caused issues, whose fault is it but the EU's?
    12.3% of the votes between 2009-2015 the UK voted against the consensus in European Parliament. In 87% of the votes the UK voted with the winning majority. You can read from that what you may, there are some caveats listed at the end of the article. Important point being that UK was sat at the table and when asked about GDPR, it voted in favor. I headed GDPR implementation programmes and think it's a good thing for data subjects, data controllers and processors. It comes with added costs and minutiae. It is dense.

    With respect to 'whose fault it is', I'm all for political debate, but having closely followed what's been happening in the commons, across the media, reading the comments and speaking to people on both sides I can only express that the seemingly continuous reliance in platitudes and allusive language does more to stoke emotions than it does for clarity and reason. 

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  • BrizeBrize Frets: 2779
    tekbow said:

    What a shame. Ignore list for you I think.
    I wouldn't expect anything less. Sorry that opposing views are so uncomfortable for you.
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  • BrizeBrize Frets: 2779

    So once again the EU gets blamed for something that's someone else's fault. In this case companies being lazy. 
    Or companies trying to grapple with impenetrable regulation that no two compliance consultants can agree on.
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