Condenser Mics?

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Are these mainly for if you want to record vocals or "Ambient" noise and not for micing your amp up for recording.

I'm wondering about the Focusrite Scartlett Studio package. You get the Interface, Headphones and Condenser Mic, but there is no point in me getting it if the Mic is useless to me as I do not sing.

I'm still not sure which recording route I'm going with yet but thought I'd clear this query up.

Thanks.

Conformity is the new Rebellion.
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  • I use an SE Electronics SE2000 for recording guitar - that, an SM57-alike and a Superlux PRA628.

    The SE is darker than the other two (condensers generally are), so you get a bit more clarity at the bottom end in my experience. The SM57-alike is quite bright by comparison, and the Superlux is great for filling in the blanks between the two.

    I have, however, had great results using the SE on its own. I always use a condenser for a room mic, mind - I just find it a more sympathetic sound for that.
    "Mains is ouchy if you get it up you" - Sporky
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  • You can use a condenser mic for an amp.  Some larger capsules can be damaged by large movements so up close and personal is not recommended with a 100w stack at full tilt.  For lower level recording (home recording) there is no issue.

    The strange challenge you find with condenser vs dynamics for guitar is frequency range.  By and large condensers capture a larger range of frequencies.  When used on a fairly empty track with just one guitar, a vocal and not much else, that's a good thing.  On busier tracks things can become cluttered - although this can be countered with strong EQing.

    The reason dynamics like the SM57 gain so much popularity in guitar dominated music is their frequency capture and mid push just puts guitars far closer to the ball park area you are looking for at mixing.  In a band situation they are also more directional so cut down on spill.

    In short, and very roughly put - for guitars in isolation I would tend to reach for a condenser.  In more common busy tracks I would prefer an SM57 (or the like) mainly because I know at mixing time there will be less work to do.

    My muse is not a horse and art is not a race.
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  • @digitalscream

    Thanks. It seems a condenser mic will also do the trick then

    I'm a bit of a novice with this so forgive me. I'm still tempted to go the Line 6 UX1 route which Barny mentioned in my other thread.

    That and the headphones should do for what I want to record for now but I also wanted to invest in a mic for micing up the amp as well and was going to go the SM-57 route.

     

     

    :)
    Conformity is the new Rebellion.
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  • To my mind, a single condenser gives a far more rounded sound than a single SM57 (or similar dynamic mic). If you hunt around, you can get some proper bargains - my SE2000 was about £40. The extra features you usually get with such mics - 100Hz rolloff and -10dB pad - can be bloody useful, too.
    "Mains is ouchy if you get it up you" - Sporky
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  • Agreed.  If it's a one mic deal for home recording then the condenser is the better buy.
    My muse is not a horse and art is not a race.
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  • davewwdaveww Frets: 146
    I too can recommend the Superlux PRA628 for close micing a guitar amp/cab.  I've also used it live to put my amp through the PA.  Still use the Superlux but these days I've gone over to the dark side and at home mainly use my apogee mic' and mini ipad
    You can pick your nose and pick your friends but you can't pick your friends nose
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  • ecc83ecc83 Frets: 844
    edited September 2013
    You MIGHT find a capacitor mic will overload some AI pre amps when micing a loud cab. It is as well therefore to look for ones with a pad, usually 20dB, this will bring the sensitivity back to ball park dynamics. 

    I would go for a small diaphragm capacitor mic. They are much smaller and lighter than the big side address jobbies , cheaper for the same quality, much more "poke-able" and generally have a less coloured response (in fact they tend to be very neutral indeed).

    One such at a very reasonable price is the AKG Perception 170 and these are very often further discounted for pairs ( not MATCHED pairs but this hardly matters in practice).

    Dave.
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