Converting a Lemon Drop into a Lucy - PICS!

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  • DannyPDannyP Frets: 773

    Curses, the pickup ring screws are too small for my normal Phillips and too big for my little watchmakers screwdriver.

    From the control cavity, there's a definite ridge indicating a thick cap, but it's painted with that graphite shielding stuff, so I don't know what lies beneath...

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  • DannyPDannyP Frets: 773
    No - if I'm REALLY in luck there will be 2 mismatched, asymmetrically joined pieces of different colours like the real thing - see Chrisj1602's post above!
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  • WezVWezV Frets: 9119
    DannyP said:
    No - if I'm REALLY in luck there will be 2 mismatched, asymmetrically joined pieces of different colours like the real thing - see Chrisj1602's post above!
    you won't be that lucky ;)   better to hope for no colour difference so you can fake it
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  • JookyChapJookyChap Frets: 4203
    DannyP said:

    Here's the neck join - hardly Feline, but an interesting twist on a classic!

     

    http://www.jhs.co.uk/vintageelectric/v100pgm_rear.jpg

    Ha! yes, I think Feline should sue :)

    Interesting though, especially putting it on a guitar that is meant to be some kind of replica/tribute, but whatever...


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  • WezVWezV Frets: 9119
    its hard to build a les paul without coming to the conclusion the heel could be better designed
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  • Esp and Ltd use a fully carved away heel, so there is no "bump". It's very nice. I think prs might have done the same on some early models? My Ltd is strat shaped, but has a carved heel with no... Er... Seam?

    It's great. Although actually, I don't mind a bit of a heel either - it's less nice, but not nasty.

    I'd take a feline over a Gibson any day though.
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  • usedtobeusedtobe Frets: 2586
    While you're pretending to be George - why not just 'pretend' the guitar is red, too..?
     so if you fancy a reissue of a guitar they never made in a colour they never used then it probably isn't too overpriced.

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  • DannyPDannyP Frets: 773

    Well, I had a go at it yesterday.

    It does seem to have a thick cap - but I'm pretty sure it's mahogany. I'm very cross at JHS/Vintage for specifically telling me by email that this model would have a maple cap, so I may have to write them a stern letter.

    Anyway, here's how it's looking so far:

    http://i611.photobucket.com/albums/tt192/p1eces/20131201_100350.jpg

    http://i611.photobucket.com/albums/tt192/p1eces/20131201_100314.jpg

     

     

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  • Can't see it that well but that's down to the veneer but there is damage to the veneer in a couple of places? So you going down to the wood next? Oohhh :-SS
    Dum dum dum, dum dum de dum, dum dum dum, dum dummmm.
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  • DannyPDannyP Frets: 773
    edited December 2013

    The edge of the veneer was pretty rough owing to factory relicing, but I've gone into it in a bit on the shoulder as shown in the first pic. But yeah, I think I might crack on and take off the veneer.

     Looks to be *at least* 2-pieces of ill-matched mahogany.

    Any tips getting the bloody bushings out? I've tried clamping the posts with needle nose pliers and levering them which worked with a different guitar in the past, but these ones won't budge.

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  • There's a trick with that - you insert a decent-sized wood screw into the hole and then thread the bridge post in as normal. It pushes against the woodscrew (I suppose any solid object will do the job) and the bushing comes out. Have a look on youtube, seeing it done is easier than explaining it.
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  • DannyPDannyP Frets: 773
    There's a trick with that - you insert a decent-sized wood screw into the hole and then thread the bridge post in as normal. It pushes against the woodscrew (I suppose any solid object will do the job) and the bushing comes out. Have a look on youtube, seeing it done is easier than explaining it.

    Gotcha, many thanks.
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  • TheGuitarWeaselTheGuitarWeasel Frets: 3679
    edited December 2013
    I've seen several V100s that are supposed to be the same model and finish with a random mix of maple cap + maple veneer, plain, thick maple cap alone (with no veneer ... I sold one on like that) and mahogany with a thin maple veneer. I think it varies according to batch and what wood they had to hand on any given day. I doubt JSH actually know themselves ... and there's one company who at the best of times have problems finding their arse with both hands :)
    My own V100 (iced tea) appears to have a cap and a veneer ... though the finish is so thick it's difficult to tell. It's as heavy as plutonium ... but I think the construction may be like a 70s Norlin: a one piece back cap ... to make it look like the whole guitar is one piece of mahogany ... with the join hidden in the tinted finish on the rounded over back body edge. The bulk of the body will then be made of several mahogany pieces ... with their face covered by the cap or veneer, or combination thereof.
    If that's the case with yours, I'd buy a cheap couple of bits of plain maple veneer ... put the join where Lucy's was ... and give it a tinted, oil finish on top of that (or nitro if you're feeling brave) and the job's a goodun. I very much doubt that the mahogany bits alone will be very pretty :(
    Professional pickup winder, horse-testpilot and recovering Chocolate Hobnob addict.
    Oil City Pickups  ... Oil City Blog

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  • DannyPDannyP Frets: 773

    I hadn't even thought of putting my own veneer on there.

    I've never done it before, is it a tricky job on a guitar that's already bound, routed, drilled etc?

     

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  • rprrpr Frets: 153
    DannyP said:

    I hadn't even thought of putting my own veneer on there.

    I've never done it before, is it a tricky job on a guitar that's already bound, routed, drilled etc?

     

    Nice thread here, about veneering-http://thefretboard.co.uk/discussion/4740/a-quick-pimp-up-of-a-yamaha-fretless#latest


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  • DannyPDannyP Frets: 773

    Thanks rpr (and @Andyjr1515 )

    That looks more straight forward than I thought.

    It might even be less work than removing every last bit of veneer and fine sanding it back to a perfectly smooth surface.

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  • TheGuitarWeaselTheGuitarWeasel Frets: 3679
    edited December 2013
    Weeeeel  you could probably fudge the binding part to look pretty okay in a relic sort of way ... certainly it stands a chance of looking better than the top may do if it's multi ill matching bits!

    Drillings and cavities are no problem ... you just veneer over them then use a scalpel to cut out the oles :)

    I bought an old Shergold bass years ago that started me on veneering. Someone had cut all sorts of punk slogans into the front of  it ... then finished it off with house paint! I stripped, skimmed and filled the top, then applied a book matched  burr olive wood veneer. I then stained the top blue and gave it a burst to hide the edges.
    image

    Professional pickup winder, horse-testpilot and recovering Chocolate Hobnob addict.
    Oil City Pickups  ... Oil City Blog

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  • DannyP;95357" said:
    Thanks rpr (and @Andyjr1515 )That looks more straight forward than I thought.It might even be less work than removing every last bit of veneer and fine sanding it back to a perfectly smooth surface.
    Hi Veneering is easier with flat tops - even though it bends over the arm relief of,say a strat, it is still a straight line at the bend and a flat surface to stick the veneer to. I think Veneering over carve tops is more tricky - the professionals would use a vacuum press. I've never tried one using the iron method... Andy
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  • DannyPDannyP Frets: 773

    Hmm, yes. Will the veneer behave over the carved top?

    Obvs I couldn't use my domestic iron. I have a heat gun, but I imagine I'd risk discolouring the veneer at best, and setting fire to the veneer/guitar/house at worst.

    Would a hair dryer help!?!?

    (nice Shergold btw @theguitarweasel !)

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  • I really wanna see what's hiding under that veneer.  

    I'm sick, I know.
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  • I use a sandbag for weighting down a veneer on a curved top ...
    Professional pickup winder, horse-testpilot and recovering Chocolate Hobnob addict.
    Oil City Pickups  ... Oil City Blog

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  • martinwmartinw Frets: 1921
    I use a sandbag for weighting down a veneer on a curved top ...
     
    I thought you might have a few handy! Put that ruddy light out! :)
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  • DannyPDannyP Frets: 773
    I really wanna see what's hiding under that veneer.  

    I'm sick, I know.
    I absolutely share your curiosity, but am wondering if it's worth the time/elbow grease.
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  • TheGuitarWeaselTheGuitarWeasel Frets: 3679
    edited December 2013

    martinw said:
    I use a sandbag for weighting down a veneer on a curved top ...
     
    I thought you might have a few handy! Put that ruddy light out! :)
    Don't mention the war! :))
    Professional pickup winder, horse-testpilot and recovering Chocolate Hobnob addict.
    Oil City Pickups  ... Oil City Blog

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  • WezVWezV Frets: 9119

    Thats the best idea really, any finish you put on will work better if its all going over the same type of wood.

    I bet the lack of the maple top is the reason they blacked out the cavities under the guise of "sheilding"

     

    You may need to even up the wood colour first as it looks like you have some lighter sap wood appearing on the bass side,  there are many ways to do this but i would try this - just for the top

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rustins-Wood-Bleach-Set-RUSWBSET/dp/B002HMVZW6

     

    It  should give you a very light straw colour on mahogany, almost like korina, be a good starting place for your colour of choice

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  • xHymnalxHymnal Frets: 252
    Is it really sad that I LOVE threads like this?! 
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  • DannyPDannyP Frets: 773

    @WezV - Yeah, maybe they're hiding the timbers, the sods!

    It seems to be two pieces, and as you say, the bass side bit seems VERY varied in colour. You can see the light area on the 'shoulder', and there's another one in the forearm region by the looks of it.

    The original Lucy clearly has it's own colour variation, with the dark stripe on the bass side. Once the veneer is all off, I'll have to make a decision as to whether to let my guitar have it's own natural colour variations 'in the spirit of' the original, or whether to bleach the lot and then recreate the distinctive dark stripe with the stain.

    @Hymnal - Glad you're enjoying it, but be prepared for it to take ages, I only have the odd hour here and there to work on it!

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  • DannyPDannyP Frets: 773
    Any tips on sanding right up to the fret board binding, by the way?
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