Recommendations - guitar repair / maintenance courses

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So, a quick bit of background...

I've been working on and setting up my own guitars for over 25 years, and although self taught I'm confident doing this. I've also worked on guitars for friends.

What I'd like to do is to be able to offer my services on a part time / semi professional level. However, I have one key gap in my experience and that's fret work - I've done odd little bits on my own guitars but wouldn't want someone else to trust their pride and joy to me without getting a bit of training in this area.

I know places like Mark Bailey and Crimson do guitar making courses and I've seen other places offering entry level basic set up workshops but I think what I'm looking for is something in between where I can develop more technical confidence in setting up (rather than just doing it intuitively) and also focus on fret work.

Anyone have any experience or suggestions?

I'm in Nottingham, so unless it was a 1 day, weekend or couple of days type thing, it would need to be within reasonable travel from me.
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Comments

  • M1ckM1ck Frets: 83
    Shuker any good to you? Should be a bit closer than Bailey or Crimson.
    I hope to do one of the maintenance workshops later in the year!
    Check the link out below (nearer the bottom of the page) I bought a tele of Jon Shuker a little while ago and the fretwork (to me) seems great.
    https://shukerguitars.co.uk/luthiery-courses/



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  • barnsleyboybarnsleyboy Frets: 8
    Check out Sam Deeks' e-book 5 Steps to Guitar Setup Heaven and the stuff on his youtube channel. I've always shied away from all that messy fret levelling and crowning and polishing stuff - until now. Also anything to do with adjusting the nut slots was just too scary to contemplate. I like his down to earth style, and simple explanations of what he is doing, and to me it makes total sense.
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  • crunchmancrunchman Frets: 7413
    Crimson do offer one and two day courses.

    One day is a bit more basic but the two day one does involve learning how to do a refret - which would involve levelling and crowning afterwards.
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  • RevMattRevMatt Frets: 500
    Thanks for the replies so far - some good pointers there.
    Will check out all 3, and particularly interested in finding out more about Shuker as they're relatively local.
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  • GSPBASSESGSPBASSES Frets: 1795
    edited May 3 tFB Trader
    I would make another suggestion, go to the Stew Mac site there are so many books and videos on how to maintain guitars. The range of books cover just about everything to do with guitar maintenance and set up. The section on trade secrets you can learn so much more from that than going on a one or two days course. Might be more expensive than going on a course but you have all the information at your fingertips forever. 
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  • JalapenoJalapeno Frets: 5427
    This thread covers similar ground ...


    I've done the GTC make a Strat/Tele in a weekend course - it's intense - coveres everything but the woodworking, so .. putting a neck on, truss rod tweaking, make a bone nut from scratch, fret levelling/dressing, intonation, wiring.  Have a word with James the owner/teacher to see if a setup one might be better.

    Imagine something sharp and witty here ......

    Feedback
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  • RevMattRevMatt Frets: 500
    Thank @GSPBASSES and @Jalapeno ; - more good options for me to look into.
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  • mrshanklymrshankly Frets: 8
    Shuker.....beautiful peak district location 
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  • TTonyTTony Frets: 20230
    GSPBASSES said:
    I would make another suggestion, go to the Stew Mac site there are so many books and videos on how to maintain guitars. 
    That would be my suggestion too.

    Many years ago, I spent a day with Dr Robbie Gladwell, running through some basics of set-up.  All great stuff and a day very well spent, but memories fade (unless you're practising those new skills every day).

    With the books/DVDs and on-line freebie videos, that's an always-there reference source that you can revisit as many times and as often as you like/need.  But all of that tuition is really one-way - there's no opportunity to ask questions about any aspect of it, or to consider different ways of doing something.

    If it's an option, I'd say "do both".  Do a day's course, ask the questions, understand some of the  "why it's done this way" aspects, and then grab a book/DVD to remind you whenever you need reminding.
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  • RevMattRevMatt Frets: 500
    I think you're right @TTony - a mix and match approach is good. I know I learn best by being able to try something and ask questions, but I also know that I have a memory like a sieve! Most of my current set up knowledge comes from a book that I must have had for 30 years called The Guitar Handbook and being able to go back to it from time to time is really helpful.

    I'll check out Stew Mac.
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