Fretboard binding - what is the point?

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I have always liked bound fretboards. To me, there is something about a guitar with a bound fretboard that says "this is a high-quality instrument, someone has taken a lot of trouble to get right". To be rational though, I can't think of a single good reason to put binding on a fretboard (other than mere decoration). I never feel any difference while I'm actually playing. 

So is there a reason? Is there any practical benefit in a bound fretboard?
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Comments

  • WezVWezV Frets: 12253
    Binding is traditionally there to protect edges.  On an acoustic body it protects a join  between top and back plates to the sides.  This area is susceptible to damage


    After that, its mainly an aesthetic choice.   It hides the ends of the fret slots, but its far from necessary.
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  • moremore Frets: 137
    edited July 28
    It is impossible to cut a  slot for the fret with out having open ends , you need to cut straight across . It is possible to nip off the tang   at the ends . So , binding the fret board  seals off the slot ends and gives a better  finish .  However, it is partly looks  and how the instrument might be played.  Classical guitars  don 't usually have bound fingerboards 
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  • WezVWezV Frets: 12253
    more said:
    It is impossible to cut a  slot for the fret with out having open ends
    it is something a lot of builders now manage to do with their fancy CNC machines.    
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  • stickyfiddlestickyfiddle Frets: 17275
     I guess it means you can have a slight rolled edge without “damaging” the wood (not that it stops me with rosewood boards). And it looks pretty
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