Booster vaccines, what is happening in the UK?

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RockerRocker Frets: 4339
In Ireland, there is talk about giving vulnerable people booster vaccines to give additional protection against variants like Delta.  Implied is the inclusion of those aged 60 to 69 (I am in this age group) who were vaccinated with AstraZeneca.  AZ has been shown to be less effective than mRNA vaccines, we had no choice in the vaccine administered to us.  It was AZ or nothing.

So just wondering what is happening in the UK about booster vaccines.  
Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. [Albert Einstein]

Nil Satis Nisi Optimum

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Comments

  • ColsCols Frets: 4017
    Planned to be given to those with severely compromised immune systems (HIV, organ transplants, leukaemia, etc).  That’s it so far.
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  • chris78chris78 Frets: 5247
    I might have to a fair bit of Googling to dig out an article, but one of the Oxford scientists involved in developing the vaccine was cautioning against third doses. The suggestion was the science is unproven and might be counterproductive. 
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  • RolandRoland Frets: 6047
    Rocker said:

    So just wondering what is happening in the UK about booster vaccines.  
    From an NHS Covid 19 briefing which I attended: At a County level the NHS has been asked to prepare plans for delivering booster vaccination. The programme is targeted to start on or after15th September. It will prioritise vulnerable groups, with the aim to complete their vaccination by the end of October. It is expected that, in many areas, vaccination will be delivered through doctors’ surgeries and community pharmacies, rather than through the mass vaccination centres.
    Known here as Old Misery Guts or the Big Bad Classified's Sheriff. Also guitarist with  https://www.undercoversband.com/.
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  • thebreezethebreeze Frets: 2032
    Is there a concern now about antibody dependant enhancement (ADE) and “pathogenic priming”?  I’m unclear whether that means one has to be permanently “boosted” every 6 months otherwise the virus is more dangerous if you’re double vaccinated?

    The original vaccines don’t seem to prevent transmission or hospitalisation, including severe illness (Israel), have they dramatically changed the vaccine for the booster or is it more of the same?  I think they’re trying to catch up with/contain the delta variant but won’t another variant appear over the winter/at some stage?
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  • axisusaxisus Frets: 21410
    From what I read, AZ was a bit less effective in protection, but it looks like the effects are lasting longer. Overall I'm not that convinced that any one jab is that superior to any other. It didn't bother me to get AZ.

    The govt are undecided on boosters thus far, I think the complication being that they are just deciding on whether to give jabs to kids 12 and over - which would use up a lot of time and supply. As mentioned before, I sort out the official Govt technical guidance for Covid vaccines, and I have just yesterday been asked to produce two version of the latest - one with 12+ included and one without. Both waiting to potentially go live pending decision.


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  • Point of order, in the UK they're called Borcester Shots. 


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  • steven70steven70 Frets: 954
    edited September 10

    The scientist behind the Oxford vaccine says boosters are not necessary for all.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-58507436

    Correct me if I am wrong, but my understanding was that the idea tweaking a 'booster' to combat a specific variant was more suited to mRNA technology (which the Oxford vaccine is not).

    Is that about right?
    If so, could there be a connection here, or am I being cynical?
     
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  • SnapSnap Frets: 5033
    axisus said:
    From what I read, AZ was a bit less effective in protection, but it looks like the effects are lasting longer. Overall I'm not that convinced that any one jab is that superior to any other. It didn't bother me to get AZ.



    There has been some very good work done by some very capable people deconstructing this efficacy comparison. It's not about lab based numbers - it's about do they stop people dying or ending up in hospital? When you look at this real world measure, they are all the same. 
    Shine one, I can't remember the bleeding reference right now, but it's proper stuff.

    One of the big problems here is the pumping of info without perspective (such as lab level efficacy numbers) into the media, social and news, making ignorant points about vaccine effectiveness. This sort of thing makes people such as the population of Australia (amongst others) think, wrongly, that one vaccine is better than the other. It's nonsense.

    This issue is one of the main contributors to the poor state of Australia's vaccination program. 

    Boosters - makes a good media story and some neat clickbait. Rather than give people a third jab, we might be better off getting more of the world a first jab. That first one is the main step in terms of immunity benefit right now. The people who created these vaccines have that viewpoint, and that's good enough for me. I think it's safe to say that they above all know what they are talking about.
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  • steven70 said:

    The scientist behind the Oxford vaccine says boosters are not necessary for all.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-58507436

    Correct me if I am wrong, but my understanding was that the idea tweaking a 'booster' to combat a specific variant was more suited to mRNA technology (which the Oxford vaccine is not).

    Is that about right?
    If so, could there be a connection here, or am I being cynical?
     
    no, Oxford vaccine is very tweakable, it was based on an existing platform, designed in days, and I think they had test vaccine doses ready in around 2 months, I think they started trials in April 2020

    They have already started trials of an Oxford variant vaccine 3 months ago
    First trial participants vaccinated with Oxford COVID-19 variant vaccine | University of Oxford

    What you should be cynical about is the frequent smearing of the not-for-profit University-developed Oxford vaccine that we see in the media
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  • chris78chris78 Frets: 5247
    Snap said:

    Boosters - makes a good media story and some neat clickbait. Rather than give people a third jab, we might be better off getting more of the world a first jab. That first one is the main step in terms of immunity benefit right now. The people who created these vaccines have that viewpoint, and that's good enough for me. I think it's safe to say that they above all know what they are talking about.
    The bit in bold x about a million percent.
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  • Nick13Nick13 Frets: 684
    steven70 said:

    The scientist behind the Oxford vaccine says boosters are not necessary for all.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-58507436

    Correct me if I am wrong, but my understanding was that the idea tweaking a 'booster' to combat a specific variant was more suited to mRNA technology (which the Oxford vaccine is not).

    Is that about right?
    If so, could there be a connection here, or am I being cynical?
     
    no, Oxford vaccine is very tweakable, it was based on an existing platform, designed in days, and I think they had test vaccine doses ready in around 2 months, I think they started trials in April 2020

    They have already started trials of an Oxford variant vaccine 3 months ago
    First trial participants vaccinated with Oxford COVID-19 variant vaccine | University of Oxford

    What you should be cynical about is the frequent smearing of the not-for-profit University-developed Oxford vaccine that we see in the media

    Indeed the rate of blood clots for pfizer and azn is consistent - source: someone who runs drug trials for pfizer
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  • I've had my booster jab. Got the flu jab at the same time.

    No side effects other than a mildly sore arm. :-)
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  • I've had my booster jab. Got the flu jab at the same time.

    No side effects other than a mildly sore arm. :-)
    Same here, though I didn't get any side effects first time round either. 
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  • EricTheWearyEricTheWeary Frets: 12749
    There's an old CoOp near me that has been shut for maybe five or six years and I noticed pensioners going in and out yesterday. Seemed odd. Anyway, that's where I'm going tomorrow for my booster, the closed shop has become a temporary vaccine centre. 
    They haven't said about the flu shot so do you think they will just jab me with it whilst I'm there? 
    I’ll handle this Violet, you take your three hour break. 
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  • webrthomsonwebrthomson Frets: 774
    There's an old CoOp near me that has been shut for maybe five or six years and I noticed pensioners going in and out yesterday. Seemed odd. Anyway, that's where I'm going tomorrow for my booster, the closed shop has become a temporary vaccine centre. 
    They haven't said about the flu shot so do you think they will just jab me with it whilst I'm there? 
    More than likely, the nurse that gave me my booster asked if I wanted my flu one at the same time and I said yes :)

    She also told me those of us on the shielding list will get another covid one in 6 months, not sure about OAP's but I'd assume more or less the same.
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  • EricTheWearyEricTheWeary Frets: 12749
    There's an old CoOp near me that has been shut for maybe five or six years and I noticed pensioners going in and out yesterday. Seemed odd. Anyway, that's where I'm going tomorrow for my booster, the closed shop has become a temporary vaccine centre. 
    They haven't said about the flu shot so do you think they will just jab me with it whilst I'm there? 
    More than likely, the nurse that gave me my booster asked if I wanted my flu one at the same time and I said yes :)

    She also told me those of us on the shielding list will get another covid one in 6 months, not sure about OAP's but I'd assume more or less the same.
    Well I’ll see tomorrow morning. The whole team at work has been offered them as front line health and social care workers so I think it’s that rather than my advancing age. 
    I’ll handle this Violet, you take your three hour break. 
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  • EricTheWearyEricTheWeary Frets: 12749
    Just had it, doing my 15 minutes wait. No flu shot. 
    I’ll handle this Violet, you take your three hour break. 
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