Squier Classic Vibe 50's P bass

menamestommenamestom Frets: 3704

Anybody tried one of these?

I've been looking at Jazz bases but these look simple and cool.

What are they good for and what are their limitations?  

Will be mainly for recording roots and blues type stuff.

https://www.andertons.co.uk/bass-dept/bass-guitars/precision-bass/squier-classic-vibe-50s-p-bass-in-white-blonde-mn
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Comments

  • 5redlights5redlights Frets: 298
    edited October 1
    There's a 50s P bass comparison on youtube that compares Fender, Marcus Miller, Squier and Harley Benton P basses. The Harley Benton is very good value for money and does a good job holding it's own against the others. I think it sounds better than the squier actually. Worth a look as you'll save a bit of money. The squier may look nicer and more authentic, but if you're just recording this may be less of an issue. 

    May come down to whether you like playing gloss finish necks or not. 

    As far as to play, I think blues, roots, rock and punk are all fine. Not really going to suit any other styles. It doesn't have the character of the split coil of the standard P-bass, but you'll get this from listening to videos. 
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  • FunkfingersFunkfingers Frets: 9278
    The most obvious limitation is the pickup. The original vintage single coil design was of low output and prone to hum and RF interference. Increasing amplifier input stage gain to compensate for the weak signal emphasises the problem.

    I do not know how faithfully the Squier Fender-Designed pickup reproduces the vintage specifications. Thankfully, aftermarket replacement pickups are available. Some of these are dual-coil noise-cancelling designs. e.g. Lindy Fralin Split '51 P Bass. (Not cheap but it preserves the looks.)

    The pickup cavity will accommodate all manner of Stratocaster-sized guitar pickups. Almost any of them could do the job. e.g. A "rails" pickup of approximately 11k DC resistance or an EMG-SA.
    Be seeing you.
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  • menamestommenamestom Frets: 3704
    The most obvious limitation is the pickup. The original vintage single coil design was of low output and prone to hum and RF interference. Increasing amplifier input stage gain to compensate for the weak signal emphasises the problem.

    I do not know how faithfully the Squier Fender-Designed pickup reproduces the vintage specifications. Thankfully, aftermarket replacement pickups are available. Some of these are dual-coil noise-cancelling designs. e.g. Lindy Fralin Split '51 P Bass. (Not cheap but it preserves the looks.)

    The pickup cavity will accommodate all manner of Stratocaster-sized guitar pickups. Almost any of them could do the job. e.g. A "rails" pickup of approximately 11k DC resistance or an EMG-SA.
    Ah so would a standard P or Jazz be quieter and leas prone to hum?  I need to think about that recording.

    There's a 50s P bass comparison on youtube that compares Fender, Marcus Miller, Squier and Harley Benton P basses. The Harley Benton is very good value for money and does a good job holding it's own against the others. I think it sounds better than the squier actually. Worth a look as you'll save a bit of money. The squier may look nicer and more authentic, but if you're just recording this may be less of an issue. 

    May come down to whether you like playing gloss finish necks or not. 

    As far as to play, I think blues, roots, rock and punk are all fine. Not really going to suit any other styles. It doesn't have the character of the split coil of the standard P-bass, but you'll get this from listening to videos. 
    Will check the Harley Benton out.  Main thing is not too slim/narrow neck.  I had an Ibanez GR200 before and it was just a bit too skinny and modern.  Gloss or satin not too fussed, I may end up doing the occasional gig but not so much that gloss would be an issue.
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  • FunkfingersFunkfingers Frets: 9278
    menamestom said:
    would a standard P or Jazz be quieter and leas prone to hum?  I need to think about that recording.
    Yeah but no but ...

    The post-1954 "split coils" P Bass pickup is noise-cancelling. Some high output versions permit switching between series and parallel coil interconnection modes. This offers a choice of two distinct sounds, both noise-cancelling.

    Vintage style Jazz Bass pickups are single coils, constructed so that, when blended together at equal volume, noise will be rejected. Unfortunately, most of the interesting tones involve one pickup being at full volume whilst the other is rolled off a bit. This reduces the noise-cancellation proportionally. Thus, using either pickup of a Jazz Bass by itself will be just as noisy as the '51-style P Bass.

    Jazz Bass style pickups are available in dual-coil, noise-cancelling formats. Some stack the coils vertically. Others place two coils side-by-side - one coil sensing the E and A strings, the other sensing the D and G.
    Be seeing you.
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  • I just got a CV Jazz bass that the previous owner had installed some Nordstrand "Split 51" pickups in 
    I don't understand a word of the marketing gumph, but they DO sound good,

    https://nordstrandaudio.com/collections/4-string-jazz-bass-pickups/products/51-split-j-1
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  • FunkfingersFunkfingers Frets: 9278
    I don't understand a word of the marketing gumph, but they DO sound good
    They bloody well should! They probably cost more than the host instrument.
    Be seeing you.
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