So many technique issues.. what's the answer?

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  • Matt_McGMatt_McG Frets: 64
    I'm guessing, for most people, just reading basic rhythms is fine (and an incredibly useful skill). 

    While we are talking about skills, I wonder if anyone has good tips for musical memory? Because I'm an OK reader, I tend to be totally rubbish at genuinely memorising anything longer than about 16 bars.
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  • LestratcasterLestratcaster Frets: 341
    I always thought it was different, same with chord charts. Not really "reading music" just a bunch of letters!

    As far as memory goes, playing in a band is good, where you have to perform songs without charts. Easy for me to say as I've been playing in rock bands for 13 years now and not once have I used a chart. Breaking up the bars into phrases helps, usually a 16 bar pop chorus is in 2 halves of 8, e.g the lyrics sung twice, or something.
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  • ClarkyClarky Frets: 2874
    Clarky said:
    Its really strange as I see they can play something quite complicated by ear, but when it comes to simpler stuff, e.g 4 strums to the bar or 1 upstrum on one of the beats they can't do it. They don't know how long a chord is meant to last, 1 bar, 1/2 a bar, 2 bars, etc etc.
    I've seen this quite a lot too..
    players focusing only on the hand fretting the notes, and not enough on the other....
    90-95% of guitar playing will be rhythm guitar, yet many choose to skip the basics of rhythm playing and go to the more "cooler" stuff of soloing and stuff. Even the most famous riffs are all rhythmical. How many times have you seen "Smells Like Teen Spirit" not played correctly or even the "Sex on Fire" riff not starting on the + of 4?

    Usually in trial lessons with people who can already play a bit I give them a chord chart taken from the RGT grades and get them to try and play through it without stopping. 8/10 they will stop in the first 4 bars cos they haven't taken into account a split bar, or it 1 chord per bar and also the wrong 7th chord type. There's also several timing issues as they struggle to keep to a 4/4 beat, in the end they can't do it. Baffling, yet they can somehow fumble their way around a minor pentatonic to a backing track (albeit out of tune bends and wrong notes).
    timing and phrasing are things I pay a great deal of attention to..
    when my students start nailing all that, they may not be blisteringly quick, but they certainly notice how much more polished they sound..
    and of course, as you say... rhythm playing is a guitarist's main job.. so it's the thing they need to be most solid at..
    I worked out once that out within the 90 minute set I play, I spend less than 10 minutes soloing
    play every note as if it were your first
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  • LestratcasterLestratcaster Frets: 341
    Clarky said:
    Clarky said:
    Its really strange as I see they can play something quite complicated by ear, but when it comes to simpler stuff, e.g 4 strums to the bar or 1 upstrum on one of the beats they can't do it. They don't know how long a chord is meant to last, 1 bar, 1/2 a bar, 2 bars, etc etc.
    I've seen this quite a lot too..
    players focusing only on the hand fretting the notes, and not enough on the other....
    90-95% of guitar playing will be rhythm guitar, yet many choose to skip the basics of rhythm playing and go to the more "cooler" stuff of soloing and stuff. Even the most famous riffs are all rhythmical. How many times have you seen "Smells Like Teen Spirit" not played correctly or even the "Sex on Fire" riff not starting on the + of 4?

    Usually in trial lessons with people who can already play a bit I give them a chord chart taken from the RGT grades and get them to try and play through it without stopping. 8/10 they will stop in the first 4 bars cos they haven't taken into account a split bar, or it 1 chord per bar and also the wrong 7th chord type. There's also several timing issues as they struggle to keep to a 4/4 beat, in the end they can't do it. Baffling, yet they can somehow fumble their way around a minor pentatonic to a backing track (albeit out of tune bends and wrong notes).
    timing and phrasing are things I pay a great deal of attention to..
    when my students start nailing all that, they may not be blisteringly quick, but they certainly notice how much more polished they sound..
    and of course, as you say... rhythm playing is a guitarist's main job.. so it's the thing they need to be most solid at..
    I worked out once that out within the 90 minute set I play, I spend less than 10 minutes soloing
    I always work on timing from the off. Doesn’t matter how fast you can play or what blues licks you have if it ain’t in time or have any good groove forget it.

    I’ve helped a lot of so so players improve their timing and they do notice it, when the phrase or riff is in time and locks in with the metronome or backing track they kinda nod their head in time and get that musical groove/inner metronome.

    And yes it’s true about a set being mostly chords and strumming!
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  • ClarkyClarky Frets: 2874
    Clarky said:
    Clarky said:
    Its really strange as I see they can play something quite complicated by ear, but when it comes to simpler stuff, e.g 4 strums to the bar or 1 upstrum on one of the beats they can't do it. They don't know how long a chord is meant to last, 1 bar, 1/2 a bar, 2 bars, etc etc.
    I've seen this quite a lot too..
    players focusing only on the hand fretting the notes, and not enough on the other....
    90-95% of guitar playing will be rhythm guitar, yet many choose to skip the basics of rhythm playing and go to the more "cooler" stuff of soloing and stuff. Even the most famous riffs are all rhythmical. How many times have you seen "Smells Like Teen Spirit" not played correctly or even the "Sex on Fire" riff not starting on the + of 4?

    Usually in trial lessons with people who can already play a bit I give them a chord chart taken from the RGT grades and get them to try and play through it without stopping. 8/10 they will stop in the first 4 bars cos they haven't taken into account a split bar, or it 1 chord per bar and also the wrong 7th chord type. There's also several timing issues as they struggle to keep to a 4/4 beat, in the end they can't do it. Baffling, yet they can somehow fumble their way around a minor pentatonic to a backing track (albeit out of tune bends and wrong notes).
    timing and phrasing are things I pay a great deal of attention to..
    when my students start nailing all that, they may not be blisteringly quick, but they certainly notice how much more polished they sound..
    and of course, as you say... rhythm playing is a guitarist's main job.. so it's the thing they need to be most solid at..
    I worked out once that out within the 90 minute set I play, I spend less than 10 minutes soloing
    I always work on timing from the off. Doesn’t matter how fast you can play or what blues licks you have if it ain’t in time or have any good groove forget it.

    I’ve helped a lot of so so players improve their timing and they do notice it, when the phrase or riff is in time and locks in with the metronome or backing track they kinda nod their head in time and get that musical groove/inner metronome.

    And yes it’s true about a set being mostly chords and strumming!
    IMHO, I've always considered that there are two principle areas to nail to get that polished sound
    1 - timing / phrasing [which are of course deeply related]
    2 - bending / vibrato [considering that they are variations of the same fundamental technique]

    these two little gems always seem to me to be the most overlooked when people learn to play
    yet these two areas are the ones that really seem expose a new player the most
    play every note as if it were your first
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  • LestratcasterLestratcaster Frets: 341
    Clarky said:
    Clarky said:
    Clarky said:
    Its really strange as I see they can play something quite complicated by ear, but when it comes to simpler stuff, e.g 4 strums to the bar or 1 upstrum on one of the beats they can't do it. They don't know how long a chord is meant to last, 1 bar, 1/2 a bar, 2 bars, etc etc.
    I've seen this quite a lot too..
    players focusing only on the hand fretting the notes, and not enough on the other....
    90-95% of guitar playing will be rhythm guitar, yet many choose to skip the basics of rhythm playing and go to the more "cooler" stuff of soloing and stuff. Even the most famous riffs are all rhythmical. How many times have you seen "Smells Like Teen Spirit" not played correctly or even the "Sex on Fire" riff not starting on the + of 4?

    Usually in trial lessons with people who can already play a bit I give them a chord chart taken from the RGT grades and get them to try and play through it without stopping. 8/10 they will stop in the first 4 bars cos they haven't taken into account a split bar, or it 1 chord per bar and also the wrong 7th chord type. There's also several timing issues as they struggle to keep to a 4/4 beat, in the end they can't do it. Baffling, yet they can somehow fumble their way around a minor pentatonic to a backing track (albeit out of tune bends and wrong notes).
    timing and phrasing are things I pay a great deal of attention to..
    when my students start nailing all that, they may not be blisteringly quick, but they certainly notice how much more polished they sound..
    and of course, as you say... rhythm playing is a guitarist's main job.. so it's the thing they need to be most solid at..
    I worked out once that out within the 90 minute set I play, I spend less than 10 minutes soloing
    I always work on timing from the off. Doesn’t matter how fast you can play or what blues licks you have if it ain’t in time or have any good groove forget it.

    I’ve helped a lot of so so players improve their timing and they do notice it, when the phrase or riff is in time and locks in with the metronome or backing track they kinda nod their head in time and get that musical groove/inner metronome.

    And yes it’s true about a set being mostly chords and strumming!
    IMHO, I've always considered that there are two principle areas to nail to get that polished sound
    1 - timing / phrasing [which are of course deeply related]
    2 - bending / vibrato [considering that they are variations of the same fundamental technique]

    these two little gems always seem to me to be the most overlooked when people learn to play
    yet these two areas are the ones that really seem expose a new player the most
    I can relate to you there, these are things I've cleaned up on myself when playing to a high level, its the difference between "performance standard" and the average Joe who plays in their bedroom.
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  • ClarkyClarky Frets: 2874
    Clarky said:
    Clarky said:
    Clarky said:
    Its really strange as I see they can play something quite complicated by ear, but when it comes to simpler stuff, e.g 4 strums to the bar or 1 upstrum on one of the beats they can't do it. They don't know how long a chord is meant to last, 1 bar, 1/2 a bar, 2 bars, etc etc.
    I've seen this quite a lot too..
    players focusing only on the hand fretting the notes, and not enough on the other....
    90-95% of guitar playing will be rhythm guitar, yet many choose to skip the basics of rhythm playing and go to the more "cooler" stuff of soloing and stuff. Even the most famous riffs are all rhythmical. How many times have you seen "Smells Like Teen Spirit" not played correctly or even the "Sex on Fire" riff not starting on the + of 4?

    Usually in trial lessons with people who can already play a bit I give them a chord chart taken from the RGT grades and get them to try and play through it without stopping. 8/10 they will stop in the first 4 bars cos they haven't taken into account a split bar, or it 1 chord per bar and also the wrong 7th chord type. There's also several timing issues as they struggle to keep to a 4/4 beat, in the end they can't do it. Baffling, yet they can somehow fumble their way around a minor pentatonic to a backing track (albeit out of tune bends and wrong notes).
    timing and phrasing are things I pay a great deal of attention to..
    when my students start nailing all that, they may not be blisteringly quick, but they certainly notice how much more polished they sound..
    and of course, as you say... rhythm playing is a guitarist's main job.. so it's the thing they need to be most solid at..
    I worked out once that out within the 90 minute set I play, I spend less than 10 minutes soloing
    I always work on timing from the off. Doesn’t matter how fast you can play or what blues licks you have if it ain’t in time or have any good groove forget it.

    I’ve helped a lot of so so players improve their timing and they do notice it, when the phrase or riff is in time and locks in with the metronome or backing track they kinda nod their head in time and get that musical groove/inner metronome.

    And yes it’s true about a set being mostly chords and strumming!
    IMHO, I've always considered that there are two principle areas to nail to get that polished sound
    1 - timing / phrasing [which are of course deeply related]
    2 - bending / vibrato [considering that they are variations of the same fundamental technique]

    these two little gems always seem to me to be the most overlooked when people learn to play
    yet these two areas are the ones that really seem expose a new player the most
    I can relate to you there, these are things I've cleaned up on myself when playing to a high level, its the difference between "performance standard" and the average Joe who plays in their bedroom.
    and the fellas that neglect this and head straight for the flash stuff never see to realise that they are building castles on sand..
    play every note as if it were your first
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