Dry guitar signal capture

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FreebirdFreebird Frets: 1008
edited July 8 in Studio & Recording
I like to save a dry copy when possible, but I have some limitations when recording stereo fx though outboard gear. My setup is as follows:

Guitar > FX8 > Kemper > SPDIF > audio interface > computer > VST FX > reamp box > FX8 etc..

I can obtain a dry copy via the Kemper if a mono signal is recorded, and I can grab the dry signal through the audio interface DI when using stereo VST amp sims and fx.

However, I think it would be handy if I could grab a dry copy of everything going through the FX8 and/or Kemper in stereo, for reamping, tweaking, and comping purposes. It seems we play differently when we interact with time based effects, and they become a part of the performance.

Do you guys DI everything, and if so how do you go about it? I've been looking at the Lehle P-Split II, which looks as though it could solve my particular problem, but I am always open to other suggestions.
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  • Modulus_AmpsModulus_Amps Frets: 653
    I have a re-amping device I bought with this exact plan in mind, capture dry signal and then focus on the recording quality afterwards.

    I ended up just using a boss stereo delay to send signal to the amp and the DAW at the same time, effect off obviously, but so far it works a treat. It is mono, but so is your guitar until you choose to make it stereo through effects.... but then it is not dry anymore
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  • FreebirdFreebird Frets: 1008
    edited July 9
    I have a re-amping device I bought with this exact plan in mind, capture dry signal and then focus on the recording quality afterwards.

    I ended up just using a boss stereo delay to send signal to the amp and the DAW at the same time, effect off obviously, but so far it works a treat. It is mono, but so is your guitar until you choose to make it stereo through effects.... but then it is not dry anymore
    Yeah, I just need to grab the dry mono signal before I hit the FX8/Kemper combo, so that I can do some editing and tweaking after the fact, before I hit the same combo again. It's all about getting the sound design right, and I also like to do multiple takes, so reamping works better if you edit the dry signals.

    This side of things is quite new to me, but once you start looking for improvements you can't stop! I already have a lot of control over the recording process, so it makes sense to utilze the workflow for stereo recordings too.
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  • guitarfishbayguitarfishbay Frets: 7096
    Yes I always take DI’s.

    If I’m using my Axe FX then I take a DI via that, otherwise I use this DI box

    http://orchid-electronics.co.uk/classic_DI.htm


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  • FreebirdFreebird Frets: 1008
    edited July 9
    Yes I always take DI’s.

    If I’m using my Axe FX then I take a DI via that, otherwise I use this DI box

    http://orchid-electronics.co.uk/classic_DI.htm
    I can get a DI from the Kemper, but only when recording mono tracks. And as I mentioned above, when playing time-based FX they do become a part of the performance, so you really need the dry takes to make any creative changes.

    It's this aspect of music that has rekindled my interest in guitar playing, and music in general. The endless noodling had finally got to me, but now it is just starting point to greater things. I used to marvel at all the big name stars who had their own fancy recording studios, but now we can stick two fingers up to the lot of them 

    PS my reamp box is from Orchid, and I did see the Classic DI. Is it transparent? What's the difference between capturing dry signals at mic level and Hi-Z? I also record vintage synths which can be a bit noisy, so I thought a transformer based DI would might be more versatile to help with any hum from the mains. So yeah, I'm a bit stuck on what type of DI box I need, which is the reason for this thread.
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  • andy_kandy_k Frets: 13
    line 6 backtrack has worked well for me, dont think they are made anymore, but you can pick them up on e-bay, pretty cheaply, captures everything you play, takes a bit of work to get stuff lined up-but can be handy.
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  • bingefellerbingefeller Frets: 5458
    I use a Boss GT-001 and it can be used to output a raw signal.  It's a bit fiddly to get it set up, but it works well.  You can then reamp the dry signal and delete the processed one as you please.
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  • CirrusCirrus Frets: 3556
    I'm too young to be this old school, but I never take a DI signal, mostly because of the psychological and workflow ramifications - I like the pressure to decide on a guitar tone, and the ability to play into that tone, and the subsequent freedom of moving on to other decisions, which I can make in the context of knowing the guitar tone won't change.

    But, it's worth pointing out that I'm an office worker from Birmingham who has largely failed in life.
    Captain Horizon (my old band);
    Very (!) Occasional Blog
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  • FreebirdFreebird Frets: 1008
    edited July 11
    I'm kind of in-between these two purpose-built boxes at the moment, but I am not exactly sure how the differences will effect me, i.e. transformer, mic level v high impedance, etc..

    http://orchid-electronics.co.uk/classic_DI.htm

    https://lehle.com/EN/Lehle-P-Split-II
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  • FreebirdFreebird Frets: 1008
    edited July 11
    Cirrus said:
    I'm too young to be this old school, but I never take a DI signal, mostly because of the psychological and workflow ramifications - I like the pressure to decide on a guitar tone, and the ability to play into that tone, and the subsequent freedom of moving on to other decisions, which I can make in the context of knowing the guitar tone won't change.

    But, it's worth pointing out that I'm an office worker from Birmingham who has largely failed in life.
    It can be a lifesaver when you are recording 4 or more guitar & bass parts, and you want to add other things like synths, etc.. I'm well into sound design now, and I enjoy creating sound pallettes that work together ahead of a project.

    The editing options should not be underestimated either, as I usually loop the various sections when recording. This means I have multiple takes to work with, that can either be spliced or used in subsequent sections via reamping.

    Basically my aim is to have full control over the entire recording process at every stage, but I do get your point, as it's how I do my demo compositions before I tweak them.
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